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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got a SS/black SR9 for $560 at Wholesale Sports (it's a digression but I have never found the "good deals" that people seem to always post. I've certainly never seen the SR9 for less than $540).

Just so you know my bias, I've had 2 Ruger P89DCs. When I got my first P89, there was a lot of talk about QA issues and problems with the P85 family. Well, I like the look of the P89 and the price was right, and I found there was nothing to worry about. The guide rod was aluminum, and the 89's were accurate, contrary to EVERYONE'S opinion at the time. I am not the best shot in the world (but I did get an E ribbon with a crummy GI .45 at Fort Dix when I was in the navy) and the P89 was more than accurate. I could make head shots (on paper) from 25 yards, and the pistol was unfailingly reliable.

I lost a little enthusiasm when they discontinued the P89 and everything became polymer. I'm used to the idea by now. I've always had either a Ruger or a Glock.

The SR9 was supposed to be my replacement for the P89DC.

The factors that went into this decision:

Prior experience and fondness for the P89.
Price
Comparison to Glock - similar, with a beefier slide and better sounding "*****" sound, not hollow sounding like the Glock. It has a polymer frame and the grip is worlds better than the Glock--slender, but that is only part of it--this polymer frame has a lot of thought put into the curves and swells, and I have a much more positive sense of control with this grip than with the Glock. Sharp, precise checkering fills out this grip and makes it preferable.

After the purchase, I could inspect the gun and vindicate my decision. I field-stripped it and the thing that jumps out at you is that the innards are just about identical to the Glock--trigger group, transfer bar, and FC group. The ejector is in the same place and the field strip is the same as for the P89--lock the slide back, push the ejector down, remove the takedown pin, and remove the slide. Back when I first got that first P89, it was a little bit of a bug to me, to have to stick my finger in the ejector port and push down the ejector. But years later, I have yet to have a Ruger slide spontaneously decide to travel through the slide stop and pinch my finger. So not a big deal. It's comforting, really, to have the breakdown be the same.

While I was investigating my new pistol, one time when I racked the slide, it went forward but stopped about 1/16" out of battery. I racked it again and it did it again. I read some online stuff, and went back to the pistol. I followed Youtube advice and disassembled the back plate and striker channel to clear gunk and shavings out of the channel. This wasn't necessary. One thing this gun has in common is a lot of bad rumors. The P89 was rumored to be inaccurate, this one is rumored to have sludge in the striker channel out of the factory. Well, if that ever was a real QA issue, Ruger has fixed it. My striker channel was clean, so I just sprayed it out and lubed everything lightly per the usual.

I DO NOT recommend removing the striker from the striker channel! The backplate is a bit of a pain to get back on. I am not mechanically shy at all, but I am aware that each time you break something down you are exposing parts to something to which they are rarely if ever exposed, among these being the risk of losing a part. The part that retains the backplate is a captive pin, but it does have the potential to break, or get lost, it or the spring behind it. The QA issue that this step was supposed to remedy seems to be resolved. There is a circumstance for which I believe it's worth it to detail strip, and that is replacing stock parts.

I haven't had this "failure to go into battery" happen again, either with drill or live practice.

Quality: initial impressions are good, I will list the cons next. Pros of this gun are, good heavy recoil spring, solid feel, excellent control, and it combines the best of three worlds--Glock brute force, Ruger asthetics and metallurgy, and Colt 1911 cocked-n-locked carry. I am not a die hard .45 guy but I am used to the thumb safety and like this option.

It has a loaded chamber indicator, ambidextrous safety and mag release, and a slide stop that is not for use as a slide release. When the slide locks back, it's locked. I slingshot it to load a round, and this is what Ruger recommends anyway.

The stainless slide is just fucking awesome. I can't get enough of things that are machined and made well, and the Ruger delivers. It's a light gun that feels heavy. It has 17 shots. The magazines are MecGar and have great fit and finish.

Now for the cons:

Much is made of the mag DC. It can damage the striker, because it blocks it but it doesn't keep the trigger from moving, so you can fire the striker against the block. The manual doesn't say this, it only says "Can cause premature wear or damage." I don't think this is a big deal. I don't dry fire a whole lot. If you wanted, you can pop the magazine DC out. Not really a con.

Here is the biggest con, and the one I fixed first: the plastic guide rod. The end that snugs against the locking cam is a metal disc that flexes in relation to the plastic rod. So, when it is installed, it's not perpendicular. I think this is why, when you have it fully assembled, there is about 1/16" of longitudinal play (you can push it in) with the guide rod sticking out the front of the slide. The rod, being plastic, bends anyway, so it's going to flex with every shot, and that is unacceptable. I could just see it flying apart at the end when that plastic-to-metal junction wore out. I ordered a Galloway rod, and I'm much happier. Nice steel rod, with a spring that is clearly the better over the stock spring, and no flex or play.

I'll be making more mods later--next up is the Galloway trigger with striker spring, striker spring keeper pin, and striker indicator. I am happy with the pistol now, and it's the first pistol that I've both had the need to buy parts for, and that made me feel like it was worth it to do that. In other words, I love this gun! It works great (range time described next) and I just want to refine the action a little bit, and also to have the aluminum striker indicator.

One last con: the LCI. Some people do, some people don't. I don't. I appreciate the sentiment but I'm one of those that wouldn't trust it anyway. To me it seems like a fragile bit that is asking to get bit off. I'll replace that too, also with Galloway. At this point this might sound like I'm plugging Galloway, but really they are the only source for parts that I've found, and honestly, I really really like that guide rod!

Finally, some time at the range. Well, the good news is, it was uneventful. I could only put 2 boxes through it, on Thanksgiving. No failures and this gun was a pleasant surprise in that it was so damned accurate. I thought I would be a miserable shot bec it had been a few years since I shot anything, but this gun would drive a tack. It's more accurate than I am, and for sure WAYYY more accurate than the Glock .40 I had back then, and after a magazine, my rust wore off and I could get large ragged holes in the target. I had a couple of fliers a bit low-right, but did I mention, large ragged holes?

I have no doubts about this gun. I also put Hornady TAP and Critical Defense ammo through it, and the kick is pretty light. It was reliable with those as well as the FMJ I put through it. It is a stellar buy and, as I've come to expect from Ruger, it kicks booty.
 

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I agree with you on both counts. I am very happy with both my SR9c and my P89DC. As well as the accuracy of the P89. It's a joy to shoot. I am still getting used to the SR9c but that is a shooter problem.
 

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Got my SR9c for $425 on Gallery of Guns including shipping, fees ad tax. Great gun....
 

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If you are ever interested in buying another gun, go to Davidsons Gallary of Guns. They have alot of Rugers to choose from. I bought my SR9B from them for 411 plus sales tax. They are not always the cheapest place to buy from, but they do offer the lifetime guaranty to replace or fix a gun that you bought from them. Even though its an online store, you can still examine the gun before completing the purchase from the dealer.
 

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If you are ever interested in buying another gun, go to Davidsons Gallary of Guns. They have alot of Rugers to choose from. I bought my SR9B from them for 411 plus sales tax. They are not always the cheapest place to buy from, but they do offer the lifetime guaranty to replace or fix a gun that you bought from them. Even though its an online store, you can still examine the gun before completing the purchase from the dealer.
I love buying from them as well.... The shipping is wicked fast too. Ordered at 9pm on a Thursday and it was at my LGS Saturday at 9 am.....
 

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I hear a lot of negative comments about plastic guide rods on various gun forums. The Beretta M9/92fs series went to plastic guide rods partly in response to sandy conditions in Sandistan battle fronts. Beretta maintains that the plastic rods are better because they are self-lubricating, handle the presence of grit and sand better, and unlike metal they flex rather than bend.

No doubt there are examples of anything but I have never heard of a plastic guide rod failing. I have six pistols of various types that have OEM plastic guide rods including two relatively new SR40cs (each of which I have put over 500 rounds through in the last 6 months) and I have never had the slightest issue with the plastic guide rod. You do occasionally hear about metal rods getting bent, however.

By all means buy a metal guide rod if you want to, but calling the plastic guide rod "unacceptable" simply is not born out by the facts IMSOHO. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
To me, it's unacceptable. I mean yeah I recognize when something works, and I don't have a prejudice. The amount of flex that a guide rod handles isn't gg to be affected by the material. But metal is always better than plastic. The plastic frame is cool, but I don't believe small working parts should be plastic. I have also never heard of one failing, but if a force comes along that can bend the metal past its plastic deformation point, then I would feel better knowing at least it's metal. Also, see my description of the ruger rod. It had to go. Plus the metal bit looks better.

There are lots of little things like this--I have these little details that give me piece of mind. For instance: I have never heard of a S&W firing pin break, but it gives me piece of mind knowing that, in the Ruger revolvers (and everyone else besides S&W), the firing pin isn't pinned into a moving piece that is meant to make impacts. Or... The breech block in a SIG/Sauer. I've never heard of a failure there either. But I'm opposed to having 3 parts when 1 solid one will do. Don't like the pinned-in block. Or... the barrel link in .45s. I've never, ever, ever heard of one failing. But face it, it's an added part with a pin, taking the place of a cam/barrel. Just doesn't make sense.
I'm also finding I'm not exactly wild about the LCI. That will go away too.

These things aren't deal breakers--except for me (and I wouldn't let the link stop me from getting the P89 if one was around). I'm sure every make has areas where they pinch pennies. The guide rod is a fairly large and obvious part that deserves better engineering. Compare the P89 guide rod with the SR9.

I'm also sure the guide rod in the Beretta is better-made than the Ruger. Let's not forget we're talking a difference of a couple hundred bucks. I would pbly also replace that, if it flexed without any real stress the way the Ruger's did, or had play in it the way the Ruger's did. And, don't forget, the metal bit fixed those problems.
 

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Bugout, if you want a left handed widget installed on the pistol, more power to you. Many of us are happy with the pistols as they come, but whatever floats your boat is fine.

There is no reason to defend your choices, but it does raise the question of why you purchased the Ruger rather than a pistol incorporating the features you like. And if you prefer a Ruger revolver over a Smith, then purchase what you favor. I am a Smith man and find no fault with their designs. Both companies make dependable firearms which go bang when you pull the trigger.

It does sound as if you are one of those who always feel metal is best, so a polymer pistol purchase seems odd. Check out the 1911 or Beretta.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Lot's of good stuff and good folks on here. Now to rub salt.......SR9's and .40s go for $449.00 everyday at Academy Sports. Bought my .40 for $419.00 on sale at local shop. But don't sweat it, you will enjoy the SR9. But be advised, buying Rugers is addicting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Budget, and I do like Rugers. I didn't get a left-handed widget. :p, I know what you mean. I had a budget and a timeline, that being the election. They make the aftermarket parts and we all buy them. I don't mind a polymer frame, and it IS a Ruger. I am not complaining to argue, or for the sake of complaining. I saw some structural deficiencies and I fixed them. I didn't get rid of the part strictly bec it was plastic. Clearly, just by definition, metal is "better." But they use plastic for a reason and there's no reason not to have plastic compete. I got rid of the part bec it was loosey-goosey. Like I said about the Beretta plastic rod, it might not matter. I had no problem with that part in Glocks, say.
 
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