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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the problem as I sent it to Ruger, and their response:

My email to them:
The underside of the trigger guard on my SR9c (bought new in September) is a bit discolored - it looks as if the surface was rubbed with steel wool, or maybe it was not finished properly there, if some finishing is performed on the polymer frame.

My question - is there a way to correct this, to make the surface of the frame look more uniform in color and texture?​

Ruger's Response:
This is normal and can be found on all SR9 pistols. Using a synthetic stock restorer product such as Birchwood/Caseys can help blend the surface areas.​

After looking at several other Ruger SC9C - SC40C, he's right that it is on other guns as well.
Has anyone tried the stock restorer he suggested, on this problem?
Any other solutions or ways to make the underside of the trigger guard as dark/black and shiny as the rest of the frame?
 

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I would guess the discoloration is from contact with skin oil, and abrasion from your second finger and possibly your holster. No matter what you do to improve it, it will likely just reappear.

Another reason I prefer stainless steel trigger guards (and the rest of the gun).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would guess the discoloration is from contact with skin oil, and abrasion from your second finger and possibly your holster. No matter what you do to improve it, it will likely just reappear.

Another reason I prefer stainless steel trigger guards (and the rest of the gun).
No - not skin oil or holster abrasion. Examples are on new guns in the showcase, always in the same place: the outside of the trigger guard, and under a microscope it looks like someone (it must be at the factory) does some last-minute "corrections" with steel wool. Maybe their mold for the frame gets injected from there, or something like that? A guess.
 

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I think you are right that is where the mold is injected from and leaves a mark behind that is removed, but not re-finished.

One idea is to take a lighter and hold the flame close to the frame to try to melt the unfinished area a little, don't touch the flame to the frame, just get it close enough to get it hot. I have used this method for a few similar things and it worked fairly well as long as you don't go crazy with the heat and have it start dripping or something.

FYI, do at your own risk....
 

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I haven't tried this...and it might not work at all....but how about the chemical for black auto bumpers and other "plastic" parts of a car?
Armorall? or some other auto liquid. Just a thought. Don't use it on the grip though. Will make it slippery!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I haven't tried this...and it might not work at all....but how about the chemical for black auto bumpers and other "plastic" parts of a car?
Armorall? or some other auto liquid. Just a thought. Don't use it on the grip though. Will make it slippery!
I did just now come back from the garage and applied first some ArmorAll and then some 303 Protectant - it does look a lot better, but it will wear off. It looks as though it needs to be polished smooth, to correct the rough action of the steel wool or whatever that was used. Ruger should have fixed this from the beginning.
 

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I think you are right that is where the mold is injected from and leaves a mark behind that is removed, but not re-finished.

One idea is to take a lighter and hold the flame close to the frame to try to melt the unfinished area a little, don't touch the flame to the frame, just get it close enough to get it hot. I have used this method for a few similar things and it worked fairly well as long as you don't go crazy with the heat and have it start dripping or something.

FYI, do at your own risk....
You are correct about the cause. They all have had this since day one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You are correct about the cause. They all have had this since day one.
Do you know of any "since-day-one" solutions to fix the problem? Am I the only person in the world unhappy with a blemished trigger guard? (Granted, there are bigger problems in the world, but still...)
 

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It's just finishing marks from smoothing off casting marks. It's not blemished it just the way it's finished.
My SR40 has it and no it doesn't bother me as the piece is very accurate everytime I pull the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's just finishing marks from smoothing off casting marks. It's not blemished it just the way it's finished.
My SR40 has it and no it doesn't bother me as the piece is very accurate everytime I pull the trigger.
And I would say, it's blemished because it is unfinished! Again, there are many other and more "incompletes" in the world - many things unfinished that greatly deserve to be finished. This is a small thing, but it is one thing that I'd like to see "finished," if I can.
 

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Both my SR9 and SR40 have this same thing under the trigger guard.
Seems to be part of the manufacturing process.
I can not see it when I am looking down the sights. Not a problem for me.
 

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I read things here all the time that make me pull the gun out and look it over. I never noticed it before. But now that I am aware of it it's driving me crazy!!!!! Please make the voices stop....... Okay not really, it doesn't bother me enough to do anything about it, but I understand your point of wanting a flawless product. However flawless in the handgun world runs your price up. That's why an Ed Brown is way out of my price range. There are some things at this gun's price range that we have to do for ourselves or learn to overlook. Enjoy shooting it, I love mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I read things here all the time that make me pull the gun out and look it over. I never noticed it before. But now that I am aware of it it's driving me crazy!!!!! Please make the voices stop....... Okay not really, it doesn't bother me enough to do anything about it, but I understand your point of wanting a flawless product. However flawless in the handgun world runs your price up. That's why an Ed Brown is way out of my price range. There are some things at this gun's price range that we have to do for ourselves or learn to overlook. Enjoy shooting it, I love mine.
OK, I get the message. No help here for my slightly imperfect Ruger, which I agree is a great gun. (In every other respect!)

But I'll continue to pursue a way to fix this thing.

Thanks to all.
 

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Sometime in the last day or so there was a TV commercial with a product that would restore plastics. I suspect it was a coating similar to Armorall and would probably come off it time. But at least it's something you can do on a temporary basis. Might even give you an excuse to take it to the range more often to "test the finish" :D
 

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Do you know of any "since-day-one" solutions to fix the problem? Am I the only person in the world unhappy with a blemished trigger guard? (Granted, there are bigger problems in the world, but still...)
It was there before I bought it.

I saw it, knew what it was and it didn't bother me.

If I don't have a "problem" with it, why would I bother trying to find a "solution" to it?

Did you not see it when you bought it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It was there before I bought it.

I saw it, knew what it was and it didn't bother me.

If I don't have a "problem" with it, why would I bother trying to find a "solution" to it?

Did you not see it when you bought it?
I "sort of" saw it. There were two factors: 1) I thought it must have been something that could be cleaned off; and 2) I had no other source for other copies of the SR9C at the time I wanted to buy, to choose instead a "cleaner" one. Of course I didn't know it was factory-made that way at the time.

All this is belaboring the point, however. The frame is what it is, and if there is a way to "fix" it I'd like to find that way. That is the point of this thread, and the only point, so please - all who don't care about the point - just please move on to more interesting discussions.
 

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No - not skin oil or holster abrasion. Examples are on new guns in the showcase, always in the same place: the outside of the trigger guard, and under a microscope it looks like someone (it must be at the factory) does some last-minute "corrections" with steel wool. Maybe their mold for the frame gets injected from there, or something like that? A guess.
I goofed. Since he said he got it in September, and this is November, I assumed it was a new "blemish". I've heard of Kel-Tecs getting gradually discolored and "fuzzy" in that area.

What you say makes great sense, that it is the injection point of the mold. On most injection-molded parts, they try to put that in a less noticed place, but that is not always possible.
 

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OK, I get the message. No help here for my slightly imperfect Ruger, which I agree is a great gun. (In every other respect!)

But I'll continue to pursue a way to fix this thing.

Thanks to all.
Did Ruger not give you a tip on taking care of this? Did you try the product they emailed you about? I'd give that a try first, but have thought about texturing, they've been doing glock frames for years all kinds of patterns. I've seen some really trick textured glocks for big money but with a good eye and a soldering iron you good do it yourself.
 

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You know I never noticed the "discoloration" on my SR9/9c/40c until you just now mentioned it!!!!!!!!!:eek:.......................Thanks! :cool: Seriously though it doesnt bother me, I still think the SR's are some of the nicest striker fired pistols available today. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Did Ruger not give you a tip on taking care of this? Did you try the product they emailed you about? I'd give that a try first, but have thought about texturing, they've been doing glock frames for years all kinds of patterns. I've seen some really trick textured glocks for big money but with a good eye and a soldering iron you good do it yourself.
Ruger gave a suggestion to try - no commitment that it would work. I would think that if it were as easy as a chemical wipe, they'd do it at the factory.

The "soldering iron" thing - would that for sure work, if done properly/carefully? Have you seen results?
 
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