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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Back in 1985 I bought a Mini-14 (184 series) and not long after getting, I replaced the ugly birch stained brown colored stock with a Choate pistol grip style. Has served me well all these years, but I want to replace with a more traditional rifle stock. I have an AR with collapsible stock/pistol grip for that look. Don't want to replace with the factory birch. What have some of you in Ruger Forum land replaced the factory stock with as far as with a traditional stock. Have been looking at a variety, most look good, but don't want to get Stock A and then wish I had gotten Stock B. Pros and Cons/Likes-Dislikes. Thanks for any input.
 

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Ok my 188 series Mini-14 Ranch Rifle came with the factory Birch wood stock. I found that the pistol grip didn't fit my hand. I did some looking at the Hogue stocks but I eventually decided on a Factory Ruger Composite stock for my Mini-14 the grip was slimmed down and a much nicer fit. Since then I have installed a barrel strut or stabilizer. Plus also added a Redfield 2-7x32 widefield scope. I did quite a bit of looking before I made the decision to just go with the factory composite stock. Plus the factory stock offers plenty of strength & it weighs less then the Hogue Stock. Hope this helps good luck!!!
 

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Revolution makes a superb walnut stock for the Mini 14 and Ranch Rifle.

It's very well made, very nicely finished and is very snug fitting. It is a drop in fit, although you may have to do some very minor fitting on the front lip of the stock where the stock liner slips over.




Here it's shown along side an older 184 series Mini with factory birch stock. You'll note the revolution stock uses the longer length of pull found on the current 580-583 series Ranch Rifles.



They also sell a walnut handguard if you want the 180/early 181 series look:



You can get them here:

http://www.ruger-mini-14-firearms.com/Stocks.php
 

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The Keystone/Revolution Walnut stocks are beautiful, and CoSteve and Model 52 report that they are snug fitting, which never hurts accuracy. I wouldn't mind having one, but recently moved and can't justify the $$$.
Disadvantages, the price of the Walnut is close to $200, and they are noticeably heavier than even the Ruger Birch stock as Walnut is denser than Birch.
As Model 52 shows, the LOP is longer as well, if you are a big guy that will be nice.
If you are drawn to the walnut but don't want a long LOP, you can cut the stock down and re-install the pad as CoSteve has done.
My favorite has always been the Ruger synthetic, it probably the lightest stock you can get for a Mini. The synthetic, while not having the warmth and beauty of wood, is tougher and not prone to warpage, although most of us will never have to use it as a club. Mine has a pretty snug fit.
The Ruger stock is slimmer than other stocks and has mild checkering on the pistol grip and fore end, just where you need it.
I am not fond of black stocks or anything else on a carbine, looks too AR for me.
The Ruger stock can be painted any color you wish, but I'd recommend Cerakote, as it will hold up way better than any other paint.
I painted mine with Sniper Grey Cerakote, and did the metal of my SS Mini-30 with Tungsten Cerakote. Since I've done it, it seems to be too much grey so I'll probably re-do the Mini with something like a tan stock and sage green metal.
LOP on the Ruger synthetic is midway between the new style Ruger wood or Revolution Walnut, and the old style Ruger wood stock.

The Hogue stock is another option, but after using one for a couple years I got rid of it.
It is one of the heaviest stocks, very thick, and the rubber over molding put on it for grip, is a bit too grippy, tends to grab your clothing as you raise the Mini up.

You can buy a new Ruger wood stock for around $100, some have a darker color and decent grain for Birch. If you order a new one, you won't get to look at it when you order, although I have talked some of the guys at Midway or Brownell's go look through them if you ask for a dark one. Those will have a longer LOP and come with a rubber pad on the butt.
You can find one of the older style Ruger wood stocks for sale on the forums classifieds, and once in a while I see one at a gun show. They usually run $40 to $50. I got this one for $40, and it is darker and has nicer grain than most. Here is mine with a 300 yard target:

I have come to prefer the shorter LOP of the old style stock. It is easier to shoot with a jacket on, from unorthodox positions and it allows you to get up closer to your peep sight. One thing I've never liked is how slippery the curved butt plate is, but I fixed that by putting on a piece of friction (skateboard ) tape.

And if you like to mount your sling in a more versatile manner like I do, front sling mount on the side of the fore end and rear mount on the top of the stock, you can do that on the old style stocks without drilling an additional hole.
Just replace the top butt plate screw with your Ruger swivel, it screws right in with the same thread. You can always put your wood back to stock configuration if you don't like it:

Mounting the sling like that allows a better "ready carry", and when not in immediate need of the Mini, allows you to carry the Mini across your back, like when you need both hands for something, without that 20 or 30 round magazine digging into your back:

That is a Choate pistol grip stock like you had. It felt really light, although in reality isn't quite as light as a Ruger synthetic. It felt really comfortable to point with and hold, but mine had fitment problems, so I replaced it with the old style wood.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Love the look of the Revolution walnut stock and handguard, but they're pretty pricey too. Would look good sitting along side my M1 Garand. I'm a big fan of wood over plastic's, but at around $270 for them, Wow! BUT, price hasn't always stopped me before. I've looked (online) at the Hogue and Choate traditional stocks, have read some of the pros and cons of those who have bought and mounted them. Checked Ruger's online store, all I can see of what they offer is for the Mini-30, at least what I've seen. Some of the offerings I've seen have reservations when using the earlier series Mini's such as my 184 type. Do like the look of the Hogue and Ruger synthetic-had prior thoughts on the Hogue as Sandog pointed out being "grippy" on clothing and such. I live approx. 70 miles north of Brownells and 2-3 times a year take a road trip there. Might have to do so and 'eyeball' the various offerings before buying and t/w their tech guys. I've already bought an Accu-Strut in anticipation of also buying a different stock. Thanks for the info--the search and research continues.

Attached a pic of my current setup. Old Weaver 4X Widefield mounted using a B-Square mount which I have no problem with no matter what some have said/printed about them. At 100yds it is no 1" MOA shooter, but I've always hit what I've been aiming at. Have over the years found what powder/bullet combo the Mini likes. Note the 'custom' cheek rest on the Choate stock. Old towel wrapped with black duct tape. Since pic has been taken, I moved up in the world and rewrapped with black Gorilla tape. It works!!! The Choate stock didn't allow a good cheek weld position, esp when using the scope. Have used this 'custom' add-on since I put the Choate stock on. Have gotten some ribbing over the years, but they shut up when they see how it shoots.
Mini-14 001.JPG
 

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Stocks for Mini-14's are more common than Mini-30's, although it isn't too hard to widen the mag well opening slightly to fit a Mini-30 mag in a Mini-14 stock.
If Ruger is only listing Mini-30 stocks, check somewhere else like Midway or Brownell's.
Maybe Ruger is making the stock's mag well the same in order to simplify their inventory, like them now shipping both Mini-14 and Mini-30 with the same .080" gas bushing.
While your set up works for you, any scope mounted over the action, whether a side mount or using Ruger rings or rail, places the scope unnecessarily high.
You have to scoot your head up in the stock to see, or add a cheek riser like you did.
Mini stocks have some drop to them due to the low iron sights.
Compare a high mounted scope to the one on my green/tan Mini-14 pictured above.
The Ultimak places a scope nice and low, and has heat sink and barrel stiffening qualities like a strut gives you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Need to clarify comment on previous post. I called Ruger and t/w customer service rep checking on why they didn't offer their synthetic stock for Mini-14 (.223/5.56) stock for sale as the ones offered on completed rifles. They do. Misread the description on their catalog page with stocks available. The heading reads "Mini14/Thirty Overmolded Rubber Rifle Stock". I was taking this as a stock only to fit a Mini-Thirty only. The stock they have for sale (item #84165) will fit both the 5.56 Mini and the 7.62 Mini's. They are made by Hogue for Ruger.
 

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Hog, the synthetic stocks are probably the lightest of he batch, so if a light, handy Mini is your thing, they are likely to best combo.

I'm a wood/iron guy, but the synthetic that came with my 583 Tactical is a keeper; considerably lighter than any wood.

There are some other manufacturers of walnut stocks, so don't give up! They are beautiful; just heavier.
 

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I am with the hogue stock crowd. I had a birch stock on my mini 14, and mini 30, now both have hogue overmolds. Now my mini 14 target has the laminated wood, it feels great, and will remain that way. But for the others hogue was the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hog, the synthetic stocks are probably the lightest of he batch, so if a light, handy Mini is your thing, they are likely to best combo.

I'm a wood/iron guy, but the synthetic that came with my 583 Tactical is a keeper; considerably lighter than any wood.

There are some other manufacturers of walnut stocks, so don't give up! They are beautiful; just heavier.
I'll second the wood/iron preference. My AR's are plastic because, well...that's how they look right. I have two poly frame pistols, a Colt 22 and a 9mm Shield, other than that everything else I have is wood/iron. Exception is My Mini-14 and a poly/plastic stainless 10-22. My older 10-22 has a look a like M1 Carbine stock. I like a heavier gun, no matter type. Heck, I just bought a older Winchester Model 12 for bird hunting, don't mind hauling that brute around, it feels pretty good in my hnads. If I were to go back into my former 21 yr LEO job, wouldn't have a problem strappin on my 4" Colt .357 Trooper back on or it would be a Colt Double Eagle or 1911 45 acp's, not a fan of the Glock types. When I got my 2nd 10-22, the poly/plastic stock felt to light (still does). Thought about filling the hollow buttstock with something to make it heavier, still plan to unless I get something else for it. I'll take a heavier gun any day over something touted to be light and easier to carry. Might change my mind someday, but for now, like the stability of something heavier. Gonna keep up the search, latch onto something that makes my eyes smile.
 

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I put a Bell & Carlson carbelite stock on this Shilen-barreled Mini I built and although heavier than wood, it's a great stock. High comb is perfect for scopes and after glass bedding was very accurate.



Also had the same stock in black on a short-barreled CQB-type Mini for awhile.
It's a shame B & C Mini stocks don't appear to be available any longer.
 

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I have the original birch, a Hogue overmolded, and an ATI tactical. My Mini is mostly in the Hogue.
 

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I had to zaz up my birch stock on my heavy barrel Mini by fabricating a grip-cap, and gave it a better paint job than what Ruger offers. But for my tactical Mini 14 I have a Choate conventional stock that is super light weight. It replaced the hogue stock that was on my tactical 14, and I want to say it dropped a few ounces.
 

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I'll throw my Mini into the mix as well. When I got my 583 Series new back in March '15, I set it up semi-M14 to match up with my M1A. My tweaks at the time were a Accu-Strut and Choate HG to deal with heating, a reduced size gas bushing to reduce the cycling forces, a Mini200 Rear sight to give a better picture, and some Wilson 1911 buffers to stop the metal to metal banging during cycling.



I soon realized that even though the Mini200 moved the rear aperture back 1/2", at 15" Heel to Aperture, the buttstock was too long for a good eye weld on the rear sight like the 14" distance was on my Garands, M1 Carbines, M1a, and AR15s so I cut the rear stock down 1" to give me the 14". this also allowed me to swap out the Mini200's larger aperture for a target version with a .042" aperture and thin the front sight blade from .077" to .050" wide. The target aperture and thinned blade gave me 'NM' like sights and so I added a trigger job to it as well. I was really pleased with it's ability to produce 1 1/4", 100yd groups with my 62grn Hornady handloads.



However, I lusted for a walnut stock and so I picked up a Revolution one and as posters above have said, it's a gem as it fits tight and solid. After I also cut it down 1", it shoulders and fires just like my birch stock, however, it is 6oz heavier. Not because walnut is denser than birch, they both weight about 43 lbs/cu ft, but because the profile of the stock is a bit thicker in the forearm and pistol grip and the buttstock more oval than Rugers somewhat conical shaping. Thanks to RJF's heads up on CDDN having them back in stock, I also picked up some OE 20rd straight mags. With Ruger followers installed, they have been 100% reliable and give it a nice look. Even though it gained some weight, it's beauty it superb and it proudly stands next to it's big brother, my M1A.



Bottom line, if you want light, the walnut stock is close to 1/2 lb heavier than the synthetics and 6oz heavier than the birch. Some of us think the extra weight is worth it. YMMV
 

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Boyd's is certainly an option, I bought from them in the past and I'll buy from them again. I'm also a bit biased as they are located in my home state of South Dakota.

They do offer their Platinum stock that has straight combed classic lines, and you can get them in maple three grades of walnut and various laminates.

The laminates are the least expensive, but laminates are heavy as they are about half glue. Standard grade walnut adds another $20. The standard length of pull is a very long 13 3/4". The shortest you can get is still 13 1/4" and that half inch reduction will cost you another $24.95. There's no upcharge for their recoil pad and it is the thinnest, and best choice to minimize length of pull.

By the time you are done, the total for a finished Walnut stock will be $172.

But, I preferred the original Ruger Mini 14 lines of the Revolution stock and it was worth the extra $17 for me.

Where the Boyds stock makes sense is if you intend to mount a scope on it and go with their Heritage stock which has a raised Monte Carlo comb and cheek rest.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Nice lookin Mini's/Mini Stock in previous posts. Got all excited on seeing Pompatus's Bell and Carlson stock. Reported to be heavier than other synthetic's, even in my favorite all time camouflage, 'Tiger Stripe', but would get it in black. He noted B&C no longer offered a Mini stock. Checked on line, a separate Bell and Carlson site said they no longer make any stocks due to health reasons. Too bad-they were always a top quality stock producer. Love the look of COSteve's Revolution walnut stocked Mini. Checked Boyds. Great stocks, but I'd like to keep my restock to something similar to the original, ie the tactical/original lines of the Mini 14 look. Searched the web (EBay/Gunbroker, etc) for a black B&C with no results. Anyone aware of the quality difference between the Hogue and Choate original Mini 14 style stocks they offer? Pro vs Con? If anyone is aware of a black B&C for sale or have one, Id be interested. Like I said before I'm almost a 100% wood and steel guy, but do make some exceptions and would rather have a good solid weight feel to a firearm vs. the lighter approach. That Revolution stock looks appealing!
 

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Anyone aware of the quality difference between the Hogue and Choate original Mini 14 style stocks they offer? Pro vs Con?
You should check out Choates website, they have great products: Choate Machine & Tool - Ruger - Manufacturer Details

I have both Hogue, and Choate conventional stocks. I prefer Choate, the Choate stock is slimmer, has a longer grip, but LOP is about the same. Both stocks have recoil pads, but the hogue stock absorbs the recoil better. I had to shim my receiver into the hogue stock to get a tight fit where as the Choate stock fit like a glove. The choate stock does way less and seems a little weak at the end of the forearm, but the gas block will reinforce it when it is attached. I shot a consistent 2MOA out of the hogue stock, and my accuracy didn't change when I swapped it to the choate stock. The choate stock does except the reinforcement bracket that screws into the mag well, where as the hogue does not. If you get a Choate ventilated hand guard, it matches the Choate stock perfectly, and lines up better than the hogue stock. You wont go wrong with either one but I prefer the handling of the Choate stock. Plus the rubber stock always stuck to my cloths and got dirty easily, seems like everything sticks to the hogue stock.

1st pic is the Choate stock, 2ed is the Hogue
 

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