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Discussion Starter #1
Very excited I managed to buy a new hammer assembly with the spur for my SP101! And it didn't cost me $100 either.

I have an SP with the spurless hammer as my carry gun. I thought several times about trading it in for one with a spur but never did because I find it hard to get rid of guns that are in good working order.

I've seen one or two hammers go on gun broker for $100+ and I definitely wasn't going to pay that. So I bookmarked the page at the Numrich sight for the part and checked several times a week for months... Always sold out. The other day I realized I hadn't checked in a really long time, so I did and it was in stock! I tried to buy two but they only had one in stock. It makes me wonder if they only got one in or if I just got the last one.

Its on the way and I'll be interested to see if it drops in or needs fitting. It ended up costing $22 plus shipping.
 

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To each his own but I have a very STRONG opinion that snubnose revolvers SHOULD have spurless hammers or internal hammers. DAO is not an impediment and the lack of a hammer spur on a fighting gun is a good thing, IMO.
 

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If you keep an eye on Ebay, or know a few shops that find themselves at "de-mil" scrap auctions, you can find most Ruger hammers and triggers, etc within a few weeks or months for pretty cheap.

I have a bunch of "double hammer" Ruger DA's, one bobber one spurred. Never has made sense to me why Ruger doesn't sell these.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It works! Its gritty (about like it was when it was new) but it works! Some dry firing to break it in should do the trick.

Petrol, I do in fact agree with you for the most part. My SP has many purposes though and I see great calue in being able to switch back and forth between the two. As my normal carry I will leave it spurless. When I take it with me in the woods and to the farm I'll probably use the spur. I can definitely see the value in the spur when a longer shot on a pesky armadillo is needed.
 

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Glad you were able to get a deal on a DA/SA hammer. I personally don't own or want a spurless hammer revolver. I don't find the spur a disadvantage for a defensive gun but that is just me. As you stated SA has it place for long shots as does 1911's and other SA handguns. JMHO.
 

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Snubnose revolvers are inherently more accurate than most people will concede. Unfortunately that accuracy is difficult to extract from a snubnose revolver due to the short sight radius, small sights and small grips of those revolvers. The guns themselves are capable of fine accuracy but they are not designed for target work. That is not to say they are inaccurate but they are challenging to shoot well.
Thankfully, snubnose revolvers ARE well suited for the task that they are designed for (close range self defense).

I've heard all the justifications for single action capability in a short barreled self-defense revolver and not one of those justifications holds water, in my opinion.

A hammer spur is just something to get snagged when attempting to draw the gun.
Even if the draw is accomplished without the hammer spur becoming an impediment, there is no valid reason to put a self-defense revolver in a single action mode. In fact, it is inviting disaster to do so.

Putting a snubnose revolver into single action mode is not going to improve your shot placement enough to make a difference in any realistic self defense situation and if you need a target gun a snubnose is not the best tool.

Please don't take this as condemnation of the snubnose platform. I think the snubnose revolver is an outstanding tool for its intended role.
A snubnose revolver is still one of the best close quarters fighting tools ever made but it is not intended to be a target gun. A hammer spur on a snubnose revolver does not add to the usefulness of the tool and more often than not; a hammer spur becomes an impediment.


Of course this is opinion and I know many disagree with my view.

Adults can disagree but I ask that you do not dismiss out of hand what I have presented.
 

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My range expectations for the snubnose are different than for, say, my 1911s or my GP100. If I can keep it center mass for 6 shots at 7 yards I'm OK. By that I mean middle of center mass somewhere. I practice at 10 yards until the last 12 shots then move it up to 7.

I'm a fairly lousy shot but my expectations for the other guns I have are higher than that and I shoot at smaller targets.
 

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Don't underestimate the accuracy potential of a snubnose. The short barreled revolver can be quite accurate. The snubnose isn't as easy to shoot as a larger gun but the gun itself is capable of fine accuracy.
 

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This crappy ol' Taurus snubby will put 5 shots under my thumb at 10yrds firing single action slow fire.

My wife took a meat doe 5 or 6 years ago with her SP101 2 1/4" snubby at 43yrds (supported single action).

Snubby's might have been designed for short range, deep cover work, but if the barrel is screwed on straight and the load is right, they'll still shoot straight even if they can't ride the roller coaster.
 

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This crappy ol' Taurus snubby will put 5 shots under my thumb at 10yrds firing single action slow fire.

My wife took a meat doe 5 or 6 years ago with her SP101 2 1/4" snubby at 43yrds (supported single action).

Snubby's might have been designed for short range, deep cover work, but if the barrel is screwed on straight and the load is right, they'll still shoot straight even if they can't ride the roller coaster.

Nice looking Taurus. Congratulations to your wife on the Doe. :cool:
 

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I can still take out a nose-sized area of a target at 25 feet with my 2 1/4" SP, in SA, which I would have trouble to do with a DAO. Sometimes one has the opportunity to cock back to the SA position with a DA. Plus, I never have a problem drawing from a pocket holster, with the standard hammer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've heard all the justifications for single action capability in a short barreled self-defense revolver and not one of those justifications holds water, in my opinion.
I'm confused by your post citing how inherently accurate a snub nose can be at longer ranges but that it should not be used for anything but self defense and therefore should not have a hammer spur.

As later posts from others have shown, there are plenty of purposes for a snub nose with a hammer spur, and that is exactly why I bought the extra hammer with a spur. Then when its time to hit the woods the new hammer gets installed. When I'm carrying it just for defense the spurless hammer stays in. Best of both worlds.
 

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Discussion Starter #14


This crappy ol' Taurus snubby will put 5 shots under my thumb at 10yrds firing single action slow fire.

My wife took a meat doe 5 or 6 years ago with her SP101 2 1/4" snubby at 43yrds (supported single action).

Snubby's might have been designed for short range, deep cover work, but if the barrel is screwed on straight and the load is right, they'll still shoot straight even if they can't ride the roller coaster.
Congrats on the doe with a snub nose. While I don't plan on purposefully hunting deer with it I'd say you prove my point fairly well, and I wouldn't say no if the shot presented itself and the SP was all I had!
 

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I'm confused by your post citing how inherently accurate a snub nose can be at longer ranges but that it should not be used for anything but self defense and therefore should not have a hammer spur.

As later posts from others have shown, there are plenty of purposes for a snub nose with a hammer spur, and that is exactly why I bought the extra hammer with a spur. Then when its time to hit the woods the new hammer gets installed. When I'm carrying it just for defense the spurless hammer stays in. Best of both worlds.
You're not tracking what I'm saying.
The gun itself can be accurate. That has nothing to do with SA operation.
The gun is just as accurate in DA mode as it is in SA mode. The shooter may not be able to get the same results in DA as SA but that is not the fault of the gun.

When people say that a snubnose is a "belly gun", it's only good for card table distances or some other excuse as to why they can't hit anything with it beyond a few feet; that's not because the gun is inherently inaccurate. Nor is it due to the DA mode of fire preventing the needed accuracy. It is because snubnose revolvers are difficult to shoot at long ranges. (short sight radius, small sights, small grips). If you were to clamp one in a mechanical rest, like a Ramsom rest; you might be surprised to find out that it shoots nice little groups.

NOW, the snubnose would not be my first choice as a target gun because it is difficult to shoot accurately. That's not saying it CAN'T be accurate, just that it is difficult to achieve the needed accuracy as compared to a larger gun.

A snubnose revolver is designed for short range work and a hammer spur is an impediment in those situations. If you have time to cock the hammer I have to wonder why you're pointing the gun at someone and not shooting them. And if you put the gun in single action and you don't need to shoot the person, you're playing with fire and maybe more.

Can you shoot a deer with a snubnose ? Absolutely. Would that be my first choice of a hunting gun? No.

Can a snubnose be an accurate gun? Without doubt it can be. Does single action capability turn a snubnose into a prime target shooting gun? Nope.

If you're going to carry a snubnose revolver for self defense I cannot envision a situation in which it would be prudent or necessary to put that gun into a SA mode.
 

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Interesting post....I have a 2-1/4" spurless hammer model SP101 to which I installed lighter hammer and trigger springs along with shims on the hammer. That has allowed me (after much practice) the ability to stage the hammer consistently. It gives me the ability to cock, aim and fire at a target with great accuracy...and still be able to point and shoot in a defensive mode with the longer pull. Doing the springs on it has turned it into a different animal.
 
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