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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,

I did a search here for an answer and I don't think this is mentioned in the manual.

I have a new 10/22 takedown and have been thinking of different things I can't figure out about it.

If I'm going to disassemble the takedown and store it in the case for a while, should I leave the bolt open or closed?

And if the answer is "closed," is it better to hold the bolt, pull the trigger and ease it on home gently or just let it slam home?

(Not that I plan on storing it any time soon. I ran a couple of patches through the barrel It's clean and ready to go. The range opens at 9:30. I'll be there at 9:29. :) )

Thanks
 

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I leave mine open with an orange chamber flag in the chamber. That way I, and everyone around me, know that the rifle is in safe condition when I unpack it at the range. I'm not worried about long-term storage either - long term is about three days for our 10/22s.
 

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I store it closed to keep the tension off the spring, and to also help keep the chamber clean from what ever.
 

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Bolt closed.
 

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It makes no difference if a spring is stored compressed or relaxed. Springs wear out by being cycled. So to answear your question, store it the way you like because it makes no difference.
 

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I store my guns with bolts closed for no particular reason other than is easy.

When i get a 10/22 takedown, I will probably store it bolt open since you have to retract the bolt to disassemble and re-assemble (easier to leave it open from when its disassembled).... Either way, closed or open, doesnt matter to the springs.... like was said above, its the cycles that wear a spring.... So technically, you will wear it more storing it closed, since you have to lock it back to assemble..... Of course, we are talking a fraction of a fraction of the total wear the spring will take, so I wouldn't worry about it...

What it comes down to is, store it how YOU want to, and dont worry about what anyone else does.
 

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If storing with the bolt closed, like over the winter, do you guys dry fire it so there is tension on the firing pin spring?
 

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Always store my Semi Autos with the bolt closed, Keep your Bolt open on bolt action rifles.

A vintage Car that is a "Garage Queen" will eventually need the springs replaced due to them becoming fatigued from being compressed for long periods of time.
 

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A vintage Car that is a "Garage Queen" will eventually need the springs replaced due to them becoming fatigued from being compressed for long periods of time.
Not true.
Compressed or uncompressed makes no difference in storing springs. Its the compression cycles that wear out a spring. That's why a car with 250k miles will ride lower than the same year car with 50k miles, Both cars have had the weight of the car on them for the same amount of time, but on the high milage car, its springs have been through many more compression cycles.

I always store mine in whatever condition they happen to be in, cocked or not, it doesn't make a difference.

Gun magazines can sit fully loaded and unused for decades, and still function like new. On the other hand, on magazines that see a lot of use, the springs will start to weaken.
 

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Always store my Semi Autos with the bolt closed, Keep your Bolt open on bolt action rifles.

A vintage Car that is a "Garage Queen" will eventually need the springs replaced due to them becoming fatigued from being compressed for long periods of time.
This has nothing to do with a spring wearing or fatiguing. Cycling the spring is what wears it out.
 

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....except where springs have a designed "set" feature. Compressing the spring helps to form the set. Which will relax overall tension once set. That's why it usually good to compress the springs for a time. One will notice a slight difference in tension once the set has occurred.
 
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