Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,577 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Opinions. Waiting on a Sig P320 to come in. Seems no different than any revolver I have.
 

·
Emperor
Joined
·
885 Posts
I have a SIG P320 and I like it a lot. But I sure wouldn't say it is no different than a revolver.

I am not much of a revolver guy. I have shot a few dozen and own one, a GP100.

Obviously, the P320 is an auto-loader which has advantages and potential disadvantages compared to a revolver. The P320 is a striker-fired action and has a consistent length and weight of trigger pull, very unlike a traditional double action revolver fired either DA or SA. Even though I have polished the internals and swapped the trigger plunger and hammer springs on my GP100 for lighter versions, the trigger pull on my GP100 is still very much longer and heavier than that of my P320. The P320 trigger pull would be much closer in length and weight to the SA trigger of my GP100, although not quite so short and light. Trigger reset is much faster with the P320 and rapid strings can be shot much more easily.

The biggest drawback in my mind to striker-fired action (SFA) pistols is the potentially greater chance of an accidental or premature discharge due to the lighter, shorter trigger action. Many accidental discharges have occurred with Glocks and other SFA pistols during reholstering when drawstrings, other pieces of clothing, fingers, or foreign objects that entered the holster got into the trigger guard and "pulled" the trigger. A hammer-fired pistol, whether a revolver or auto-loader allows the user to "ride the hammer" with the thumb while reholstering which greatly reduces this potential risk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Don't mean to hi-jack but doesn't the striker fired need the slide to cock the pistol while a hammered fired double action has the trigger cock and release the hammer? In other words if you pull the trigger on a striker fired firearm and it fails to fire you cannot pull the trigger again until you cycle the action. While with a hammer fired auto you can just pull the trigger again and it will hit the primer a second time. Or have I got this all messed up? I'm comparing a Ruger LCP to a Sig P230.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,577 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Don't mean to hi-jack but doesn't the striker fired need the slide to cock the pistol while a hammered fired double action has the trigger cock and release the hammer? In other words if you pull the trigger on a striker fired firearm and it fails to fire you cannot pull the trigger again until you cycle the action. While with a hammer fired auto you can just pull the trigger again and it will hit the primer a second time. Or have I got this all messed up? I'm comparing a Ruger LCP to a Sig P230.
I hope some one answers this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,106 Posts
Don't mean to hi-jack but doesn't the striker fired need the slide to cock the pistol while a hammered fired double action has the trigger cock and release the hammer? In other words if you pull the trigger on a striker fired firearm and it fails to fire you cannot pull the trigger again until you cycle the action. While with a hammer fired auto you can just pull the trigger again and it will hit the primer a second time. Or have I got this all messed up? I'm comparing a Ruger LCP to a Sig P230.

This is true. The only thing that would be different is if it was a single action. Then all you would have to do is pull the hammer back ,then pull the trigger. Unless you had a bad primer,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Don't mean to hi-jack but doesn't the striker fired need the slide to cock the pistol while a hammered fired double action has the trigger cock and release the hammer? In other words if you pull the trigger on a striker fired firearm and it fails to fire you cannot pull the trigger again until you cycle the action. While with a hammer fired auto you can just pull the trigger again and it will hit the primer a second time. Or have I got this all messed up? I'm comparing a Ruger LCP to a Sig P230.
This is generally true, but not always. For example the LC9 has the hammer partly cocker by the slide action. It cannot be fired again with just another trigger pull if a round didn't ignite. A gun could probably be made where the striker is fully cocked by the trigger, though I am not aware of any that do that.
 

·
Emperor
Joined
·
885 Posts
Don't mean to hi-jack but doesn't the striker fired need the slide to cock the pistol while a hammered fired double action has the trigger cock and release the hammer? In other words if you pull the trigger on a striker fired firearm and it fails to fire you cannot pull the trigger again until you cycle the action. While with a hammer fired auto you can just pull the trigger again and it will hit the primer a second time. Or have I got this all messed up? I'm comparing a Ruger LCP to a Sig P230.
Yes you are correct. I believe there are some striker-fired action pistols in which the striker is cocked by the trigger that have "second strike" capability but most, including the P320, do not. With most SFA pistols the striker is either completely cocked are partially cocked by the cycling of the slide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,607 Posts
Don't mean to hi-jack but doesn't the striker fired need the slide to cock the pistol while a hammered fired double action has the trigger cock and release the hammer? In other words if you pull the trigger on a striker fired firearm and it fails to fire you cannot pull the trigger again until you cycle the action. While with a hammer fired auto you can just pull the trigger again and it will hit the primer a second time. Or have I got this all messed up? I'm comparing a Ruger LCP to a Sig P230.
With the 1911 it wont do any good to pull trigger again unless you manually cock hammer or cycle the action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,142 Posts
Opinions. Waiting on a Sig P320 to come in. Seems no different than any revolver I have.
Is that troll bait? ;)

I'm hoping to try a P320 soon but it could hardly be more different than a revolver. About the only thing in common is the lack of external safeties and that they both have triggers, sights, etc. The firing mechanism, trigger pull, proper grip, etc, etc are all very different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Thanks all and paulnlee sorry for butting in. Had been debating a new striker fired ccw myself but am concerned by the above. "Second strike" capability seems important to me as I know my first reaction will be to pull the trigger again in case of a ftf. But TMB you are correct, my 1911 sure doesn't work that way. Had been wanting to go up to a 9 mm from my .380 but didn't want to give up the second strike capability my old Sig P230 has. When I only have 7 rounds I hate to eject one without trying it a second time but intelligent thought would say cycle and move on.
 

·
Emperor
Joined
·
885 Posts
Opinion is divided but I suspect the majority would say rapidly cycle the slide rather than pull the trigger a second time.

In a life or death situation if you pull the trigger a second time there is no guarantee the round will ignite and if it doesn't you may be out of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
I've been going round and round on triggers. for defensive guns, almost anything works, your just going to be blasting. for target/range guns, shot for enjoyment, it's another story.
I want a gun with a trigger that has no take up, crisp break and a clean, no over travel reset. DA/SA pistols are the worse, they're just duty pistols(free play, creep, the wall, over travel, reset and then start all over--Yuk!). tuned up 1911's and some tuned up striker fired pistols can get real close to what I want. for me the single action revolver is the best. a 5-6" barrel single action revolver with some fiber optic sights and I can shoot very tight groups. I shot a nice S&W 66 at the range yesterday, like a GP100, the DA is even good.
(the take up on pistol triggers is the mechanism releasing the safeties before letting the firing pin go. it's part of the design. target guns are not carry guns).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,715 Posts
I believe (maybe incorrectly) that the Taurus 24/7 pistol while being striker fired has a second strike capapbility AND a decocker.

To the poster who said that revolvers are safer because you can ride the hammer while holstering; there are a lot of hidden hammer revolvers being sold today.

Revolvers (other than the SA models) generally have longer and heavier trigger pulls. A strike fired hangun with a similar trigger would be just as safe.

Bottom line, it's not the type of hangun that is the issue, it is the trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,577 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks all and paulnlee sorry for butting in. Had been debating a new striker fired ccw myself but am concerned by the above. "Second strike" capability seems important to me as I know my first reaction will be to pull the trigger again in case of a ftf. But TMB you are correct, my 1911 sure doesn't work that way. Had been wanting to go up to a 9 mm from my .380 but didn't want to give up the second strike capability my old Sig P230 has. When I only have 7 rounds I hate to eject one without trying it a second time but intelligent thought would say cycle and move on.
No problem, the more opinions the better.The P320 just won NRA's gun of the year for 2016
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,402 Posts
Really thinking about a P250 Compact in 45 ACP. Don't see a lot of difference with the P320 except for the sight upgrade on the 320.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Really thinking about a P250 Compact in 45 ACP. Don't see a lot of difference with the P320 except for the sight upgrade on the 320.
...and the striker fired versus hammer fired, of course?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
To the poster who said that revolvers are safer because you can ride the hammer while holstering; there are a lot of hidden hammer revolvers being sold today.
They also require the cylinder to rotate. Something else you can feel, but also something that is unlikely to happen in a reasonably tight-fitting holster. I think you'd be hard pressed to have the trigger catch on something while holstering a revolver without noticing it before it fired.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,715 Posts
They also require the cylinder to rotate. Something else you can feel, but also something that is unlikely to happen in a reasonably tight-fitting holster. I think you'd be hard pressed to have the trigger catch on something while holstering a revolver without noticing it before it fired.
Yup, you be correct.

You can tell how many times I've holstered a revolver....
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top