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This is bound to irk some one, but hey, its way too quiet in here anyway... . Seems to me that the market has been swamped with synthetic's in recient years & I can't say as I buy into all the hype. All three of my remaining rifles wear Laminate Wood Stocks as well as a Stainless Steel Barrel & Reciever. In the past I have had one rifle with a synthetic stock, didn't keep it for long, I had several complaints with the Synthetic Stock I had on a Ruger, first, I just couldn't get comfortable with it, it was so light the balance seemed all wrong to me & the recoil was intensified. The other glaring inadiquacy I found with a Synthetic Stock was how cold it felt in my hands (this is a big deal for me, living in northern Alberta, Canada), far different to how a wood stock feels in the hands in cold weather. Having had that one rifle with a Synthetic Stock I am cured, I will stick to real wood, I like the look of the Laminate Wood stocks on my rifles. I treat my rifles with the utmost in respect & care, so even the wood stocks look good for many years. The latest craze for synthetic stocks kinda reminds me of tools, some guys like the utility grade you find at Canadian tire... I kind prefer the classy look of my snap-on tools, they fit me better. To each, thier own I guess, I could care less what someone else owns.
I was at Wapiti Shooters wepons range yesterday, there was a guy beside me shooting a rifle with a synthetic stock, .338 Ultra Mag, who was cursing after every shot. His shots were all over the place, something like an 18" "group" if you could call it that. I was coaching a friend who was sighting in his new .270WSM as well as shooting my .444, finally this guy asks me whats wrong, why are his shots scattering, so I watched him crank off 3 rounds, then told him he had the worst flinch I have ever seen, I said you must keep an eye on the objective through your scope, he was literally lifting his head back & away from the scope as he pulled the trigger. I feel sorry for any critter he hunts, I am sure he would be a better shot with a lighter caliber & a heavier rifle.
Currently I own a Ruger K10/22T with a golden laminate stock, a Marlin XLR with a grey laminate stock & a Ruger M77MkII Compact with a grey laminate stock, you couldn't give me another rifle with a Synthetic Stock. /Rant[xx(]
--Ken[^]
 

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It think sythentic does have a place(not every place) and is superior in some applications, The one time i had a wood stock fail on me was out right necessary abuse on my part. Seems an 18 wheeler driver was having some serious issues going down the wrong side of the interstate, running folks off the road, and on the radio that he was going to find city hall and make it a drive-thru. Long story short, a front tire was shot out, he was stopped, and we had to force our way into the cab. The butstock of a shotgun is a poor tool to break the passenger side door window on a kenworth as it broke the stock. (another reason we went to the asp baton later on). Got him distracted though as the other officer broke the drivers side window with his pistol (resulting in a bad cut to him). Anyway, problem solved but my shotgun was out of commission. Perhaps a synthetic would have helped there.(or the proper tool, but was a matter of on hand).
Another case of the advantage of the synthetic was a novice shooter that obtained a remington 30-06 syn mdl 700 ADL. This gun was beating him to death so at the advice of someone, he removed the pad and some of the insulation and filled her up with sand, sealed it, and put the pad back on. Don't know how much he added but it sure made the gun very butt heavy instead of muzzle heavy and tamed the recoil very easily and economically.(poor boy method) Course made it a bit heavy to carry.

I still prefer wood on most of my guns. Advantages of a wood stock is that it can easily be shaped. If i need to add spacers to lengthen it--no problem. Need to cut it to shorten it or change the angle--no problem. I've seen many an old rifle where the stock had been cut down for a female or a younger shooter. Lot cheaper to work on what you got instead of running out and buying a youth stock or a youth gun. For the most part, it is also easier to put a good recoil pad on a wood stock. Problem there is the availability of quality wood and the price. Face it, look at an old iver johnson single shot shotgun that came from the factory decades ago with a curly maple stock and compare it to h&r's current offer of a black painted Beech(or whatever) cheap stock or the apple-crate wood on some of the savage rifles offered. No comparison in quality there but putting fine wood on some guns would drive up the price and make them cost prohibitive for a majority of the market.

Then again, it is the cheap synthetics that i mostly see. There are very high dollar synthetics available out there.

Still all in all, i just prefer wood as it is traditional. No doubt the next generation will prefer synthetic and probably be making comparisons of the older synthetics to the new spaceage synthetics.
Yes, i know of the advantages of synthetic, but then again i am already set in my ways. I appreciate the beauty and function that a wood stock has--it just looks and feels "right". A hawken muzzleloader or a winchester mdl 94 with black synthetic stocks are just about the worst abominations that i have seen--but to each his own.

It all comes down to the consumer.
 

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Just as I couldn't picture a synthetic stock on my 77/22, I would equally barf at the sight of wood on my AR-15.
 

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I agree that both have their place. I have a Remington Nylon 66 that is very light, and perfect for a Child to learn to shoot with. If you were hiking through the woods with a rifle, or carrying a CCW every day, the lighter ones work good. I love the beautiful wood stocks, but I think the synthetic has its place.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Tweek

Just as I couldn't picture a synthetic stock on my 77/22, I would equally barf at the sight of wood on my AR-15.
Wood on an ar15---that would get a deer in the headlights look!!!
 

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I like the synthetic for ease of maintenance...and the black on stainless look on rifles...on shotguns, I like wood(Deputy, there's a spring-loaded center punch about the size of a pen that would be easily carried on your person...just press it on tempered glass till it snaps and the window/windshield is a million glass crumbs...also good to keep handy in case the car hits the water and you lose electric windows)...I remember rolling up lead sheet and putting it in the stock of my 12 ga. double....dampens recoil real well....
 

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quote:Originally posted by Tweek

Just as I couldn't picture a synthetic stock on my 77/22, I would equally barf at the sight of wood on my AR-15.
:D:D That AR's a bad visual!:D

When I was a kid I stayed away from the "new" Nylon 66 because I thought plastic was only for toy guns. Funny how we adjust with age.:) Heck I used to think the Edsel was ugly....Wait ...it was![V]

SD
 

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I love the look and feel of real wood - laminated or not. Having said that, my 2 main hunting rifles have synthetic stocks (7mm-08 & .243). They're not pretty at all, don't feel especially good but they do exactly what they're supposed to do. I hunt when I can and it doesn't matter whether it's raining, snowing, you name it. I never worry about my guns point of impact changing or getting a scratch in my beautiful, hand-rubbed finish. They are tools - plain and simple. My Ruger 77 .22 Hornet has a wood stock and I love it, but it doesn't go out in bad weather or in the thorn bushes. Different tools for different jobs.
 

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I have had both and it seems to me the felt recoil of wood is less. Maybe it's all in my head but my shoulder felt better.
 

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I have no problem with synthetic stocks. I still enjoy looking at a fine grained wood stock.
 

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Years ago I was the first on the block to have a synthetic stock rifle. I got it custom made from Brown precision near Chico, CA. I fitted this stock to my Ruger M77 in 25-06, and painted it wrinkle green, as was the custom of the day. Later I got another for a Mauser 98 in 338-06 with custom McGowen barrel. I lived in the rain country on Northern California's coast where the rifle was subject to the weather. When I got into Bench Rest shooting, the only stock to have was a synthetic, as it still is today. I'v had aluminum Bench Rest stocks too, because they are rigid. Why synthetic, because they are stable.......Wood looks nice, but can shift pressure on the barrel when subject to moisture. Things change, and synthetic is in, as is stainless steel actions and barrels. If you want a deep figure walnut stock and high luster blue barrel, you can get it. If you want utility, get synthetic and stainless. If I were to get just one more rifle, it would have a camo syenthetic stock, stainless action, and a light weight short stainless barrel. Oh ya, in 308. KERMIT
 

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quote:Originally posted by kermit

Years ago I was the first on the block to have a synthetic stock rifle. I got it custom made from Brown precision near Chico, CA. I fitted this stock to my Ruger M77 in 25-06, and painted it wrinkle green, as was the custom of the day. Later I got another for a Mauser 98 in 338-06 with custom McGowen barrel. I lived in the rain country on Northern California's coast where the rifle was subject to the weather. When I got into Bench Rest shooting, the only stock to have was a synthetic, as it still is today. I'v had aluminum Bench Rest stocks too, because they are rigid. Why synthetic, because they are stable.......Wood looks nice, but can shift pressure on the barrel when subject to moisture. Things change, and synthetic is in, as is stainless steel actions and barrels. If you want a deep figure walnut stock and high luster blue barrel, you can get it. If you want utility, get synthetic and stainless. If I were to get just one more rifle, it would have a camo syenthetic stock, stainless action, and a light weight short stainless barrel. Oh ya, in 308. KERMIT
Yeah, Kermit Brown Precision is just north of Chico in Los Molinos,Ca. The place doesn't look like much from the outside but nice workmanship within.
...and yes, in changing moisture areas which is almost everywhere the synthetic provides superior utility to wood however laminated wood seems to be close to synthetic in my experience.

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Wood it is for me when hunting. I own one synthetic stocked gun and use it to hunt in bad weather. Stainless 25/06 m77mk2. To me hunting is getting back to nature and the connection of the wood stock just seems more natural. Besides Blued, walnut guns just look a whole lot more appealing to me. What better type of camo could you have as a stock on your gun then a piece of wood?
 

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To me it depends on the rifle... For most tactical rifles, I want it lightweight and weather resistant, like a M16. However, I can't see having a synthetic stock on a M14.
 

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Does anyone know where I can finda replaement stock for a tang safety model ruger ultra light short action? Thanks, Lonnie
 

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I'm a fan of stainless, but not on my 10/22 Sporter. It took me a good while to decide which 10/22 I wanted, though I'd had a regular carbine 10/22 in a "previous shooting life". In it's case, I sanded off the walnut stain, and revarnished the bare birch.

Stainless, I discovered, was the barrel only. The synthetic didn't "feel" right, was top heavy in balance, and near impossible to put swivels on. The American Walnut Sporter was just "right", had a butt pad and even came with fixed swivels, which I like. The black metal on walnut looks right, too.
 
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