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I worked a few hours cutting up fallen trees on our farm. I've often carried a sidearm on my hip in a full-flap holster.

That can be awkward with chainsaw chaps, multitool, and getting on/off tractors or UTVs. So today I tried my new Grommet Leathercraft Tanker holster. I've used it briefly before for my CZ-75, and now I'm going to order a second for my GP-100.

This holster lets me keep the gun under an outer layer but be able to get to it quickly. I'll be practicing my draw-stroke. I carry on the farm because we had an armed trespasser a few years ago, an idiot with a BS story but with a Ruger American Pistol jammed into overly tight jeans. I was unarmed but convinced him to leave and got his name and license for an incident report with our Sheriff.

Anyhow, here's the rig. Good workmanship, delivery time, and comfort. Lining protects the finish.

El Paso was my other option, but their customer service has declined. Did not answer some of my questions well and did not answer my final inquiry at all.
 

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Not familiar with the holster so my question is how and where on your body are you carrying? I'm doing much the same type of work on and off and have to leave my daily carry in the house and "pocket" a Colt Pony while cutting.
Deacon Bob
 

· Grand Inquisitor
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not familiar with the holster so my question is how and where on your body are you carrying? I'm doing much the same type of work on and off and have to leave my daily carry in the house and "pocket" a Colt Pony while cutting.
Deacon Bob
Under my left arm, but lower than a traditional shoulder holster. It clips to my steel-core gun belt that I wear a lot even when not carrying. You can see some pics of Grommet's work here:


I like how adjustable it is. The pictures on their site show it more in a chest position. I wanted it under my arm. The straps permit that easily. You have a lot of control about where and how to wear it. It sure helped Army and Marine tankers from WW 2 to the present, where the vehicle is full of things to get snagged on when entering or leaving it.
 

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Under my left arm, but lower than a traditional shoulder holster. It clips to my steel-core gun belt that I wear a lot even when not carrying. You can see some pics of Grommet's work here:


I like how adjustable it is. The pictures on their site show it more in a chest position. I wanted it under my arm. The straps permit that easily. You have a lot of control about where and how to wear it. It sure helped Army and Marine tankers from WW 2 to the present, where the vehicle is full of things to get snagged on when entering or leaving it.
Thanks for the picture and the manufacturer email address.
 

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Wore a GI setup when I drove an APC back in the 70's.
Can be very handy set up right.
I wear a Alaskan made Diamond with my S&W M69.
Very comfortable for all day wear.
That looks like a very handy setup.
 

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@Old School Wheelgunner , that is a sweet looking holster.

It's interesting that you posted this.

I've had a US Tankers M7 holster for years, it's just something I picked up at a gunshow to go with my 1911's, there were plenty NOS available when the Army changed to the Beretta.
Never really wore it much, mostly it's been in a box with several other miscellaneous holsters I have.

I wore one occasionally when I was in the army, but being a Cav Scout, my primary weapon was always an M16.

Fast -forward to today......
Earlier this week I was out hunting, and I usually carry a sidearm in a leather pancake holster on my hip.
I always carry a sidearm when I'm out there, here in Texas, everything in the brush is trying to kill me. :)

I noticed that wearing a pistol on my hip is really not the most comfortable way to carry when hunting, especially when you are sitting for hours. On my way home, it hit me that maybe I should try the old M7.
That was my duh moment for the day.

It's comfortable, keeps the pistol handy and secure and surprisingly, any pistol that I normally would want to carry hunting, fits in the holster. 1911, Beretta 92 & 96, Walther P1, hell, even my Luger fits in there. :ROFLMAO:

As you mentioned, it's easily adjustable whether you want to carry it under the arm or closer to the chest.

Auto part Fashion accessory Metal Strap Working animal
 
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It's comfortable, keeps the pistol handy and secure and surprisingly, any pistol that I normally would want to carry hunting, fits in the holster. 1911, Beretta 92 & 96, Walther P1, hell, even my Luger fits in there. :ROFLMAO:

As you mentioned, it's easily adjustable whether you want to carry it under the arm or closer to the chest.
I keep mine closer to my chest.

A Mark II fits in there nicely also. :)
 

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I recognize that holster. As a tanker the .45 was my primary weapon, if you don't count the 105mm main gun, .50 cal in the cupola, and the 7.62 coax. After carrying a .45 in those holsters 24/7 for weeks my shoulder would get mighty sore. Note the poor trigger discipline of the clown in the picture below.
 

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I recognize that holster. As a tanker the .45 was my primary weapon, if you don't count the 105mm main gun, .50 cal in the cupola, and the 7.62 coax. After carrying a .45 in those holsters 24/7 for weeks my shoulder would get mighty sore. Note the poor trigger discipline of the clown in the picture below.
Clown?

Looks like a normal 2nd LT. to me.
 

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Okay, not a clown. Just someone clowning around before having to go march in a parade at Graf.
I got a photo of myself in the same scarf for an IG inspection or change of command ceremony or something....
I only got a 1911a1 when I filled in on an M551 or M60 for gunnery at Graf.
3AD Buedingen FRG
Smile Helmet Flash photography Military person Door
 
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I got a photo of myself in the same scarf for an IG inspection or change of command ceremony or something....
I only got a 1911a1 when I filled in on an M551 or M60 for gunnery at Graf.
3AD Buedingen FRG
Well done. I still have my old field jacket with the patch my crew got for being the second high tank in 2AD during the '74 tank gunnery season. I was the gunner on that crew (bragging rights).

Sheridans were kind of cool because of how quick they were compared to the lumbering M60A1s. The problem was they were so light that if you didn't pull your head away from the sight before you sent a 152mm round down range, you'd get a black eye. The front two or three road wheels would come off the ground from the recoil of the main gun.

One year my battalion (1/66 Armor) didn't have enough tankers to fully man all the crews so mechanics and cooks were drafted to fill empty crew positions. As I recall they became loaders.
 

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Who keeps the tanks clean?

The only thing I know about armor is how to take it out.
The tank crews clean them.
Just like in the movie "Fury". :LOL:

I was in the cavalry, spent lots of time at the wash racks after going to the field.
Crawling under the tracks to clean the mud out of the inside roadwheels really sucked in cold weather.
 
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Well done. I still have my old field jacket with the patch my crew got for being the second high tank in 2AD during the '74 tank gunnery season. I was the gunner on that crew (bragging rights).

Sheridans were kind of cool because of how quick they were compared to the lumbering M60A1s. The problem was they were so light that if you didn't pull your head away from the sight before you sent a 152mm round down range, you'd get a black eye. The front two or three road wheels would come off the ground from the recoil of the main gun.

One year my battalion (1/66 Armor) didn't have enough tankers to fully man all the crews so mechanics and cooks were drafted to fill empty crew positions. As I recall they became loaders.
I was in 3/12 Cav and they tended to use us scouts to fill in as loaders and drivers.
Lots of personnel shortages in the 70's.
You definitely did not fall asleep in the driver seat when the Sheridan was shooting that main gun with conventional HEAT rounds. We traded the M551 Sheridans in for M60's in 1978.

Driving an M60a1, even over rough terrain, was smooooooth compared to pretty much everything else.
But then again, we knew it as a 52 ton, radio mounted, (expletive deleted) :ROFLMAO:
 

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The tank crews clean them.
Just like in the movie "Fury". :LOL:

I was in the cavalry, spent lots of time at the wash racks after going to the field.
Crawling under the tracks to clean the mud out of the inside roadwheels really sucked in cold weather.
The nice thing about being an infantryman was we only had to clean our rifles and pistols.
 
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