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· Registered
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2,096 Posts
I receive SS Benefits. The Feds tax the gross benefits...then they deduct the Medicare premiums from the remainder before cutting a check...Thus my $1100 check arrives with $732.00 typed in. So to answer your question...Yes I pay Federal Tax on the SS gross, and I pay Federal Tax on what they keep for the Medicare Plan A segment. I do a voluntary withholding on my Fed benefits, after being caught short at Years end a couple of times.

I have to report my SS Benefits to Indiana for tax purposes, but they credit a deduction for the amount of the SS benefit against my State (and county) income taxes.
 

· Larry the Conservative
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5,458 Posts
Regular SS and SSI are taxable but the income is so low that in the end, no taxes will be paid.

I now draw SS Disability and it is not taxable. That also applies to any back pay you receive. It can be reported on your 1040 as non-taxable just like VA disability payments.
 

· Administrator
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23,781 Posts
If that is your only income then it isn't but:

One of the more common questions asked of Social Security Disability representatives is “Are my SSDI payments taxable?” The answer, quite simply, is that it depends on your total income. For most people, if Social Security Disability benefits payments represents your only income, you will not be subject to federal income taxes.

If, however, you have other income, either from your spouse or from passive income such as rent and investment income, you may be subject to taxation of part of your Social Security Disability benefits. The factors considered are whether you are married and what your total (combined, if married) income is.


If you’re single and your only income comes from your Social Security Disability benefits, you won’t need to worry about federal income tax. If you have other sources of income, your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits will be taxable if your total income (including your SSDI payments) is greater than $25,000 per year. Fortunately, though, you won’t have all of your benefits amount taxed. It breaks down like this, for single people:
  • Individuals making more than $25,000 but less than $34,000 are subject to taxation on half of their Social Security Disability benefits.
  • Individuals making more than $34,000 are subject to taxation on 85% of the Social Security Disability benefits.
Are SSDI payments taxable?
 

· Registered
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95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That is my only income (disability ) and my wife is my dependent. Thanks Terry for that info, at least I won't get slammed. Also thanks to all for your input it eases my mind a bit!!
Tom G.
 
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