Ruger Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,038 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Today I was talking with one of my clients, an MD, and I kidded him he must see a surge in salmonella cases on black friday. Surprisingly, and thankfully, he's never seen a patient get salmonella from Thanksgiving dinner.

He did say though, that two things are very common and deadly.

#1 Salt.

Salt is the number one Thanksgiving killer. Almost everything has a dash or 10 of salt and an all day saltfest is seriously dangerous for many people. In this practice of 7 physicians, they get at least two hart related injuries because of salt.

#2 Alcohol withdrawal.

Not as serious as the salt thing but still a threat. When the doc said this I was like, "you mean people get the DTs just after TG?" He said no. What happens is that the people who do not consume much alcohol in general and get their drink on, on turkey day with dinner and football and just drinking for the hell of it. Well, it turns out that if you stop all at once you can get hart palpitations, and in some cases, cardiac arrest.

So, for goodness sake don't stop cold turkey. This is a valid excuse to have that bloody mary or mimosa with black friday breakfast.

Have a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving y'all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
My wife and I don't use salt on anything. Not even french fries. In medical terms, it tastes icky to us.
As for the alcohol my wife doesn't drink and I can nurse a drink for hours.
Don't invite us to a party. We are very boring.
As for Thanksgiving this year.......I think it's going to be pizza here.
If they could make a turkey taste like pepperoni I would be in heaven.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,243 Posts
Salmonella isn't very common in the U.S., since most people know that poultry needs to be cooked well. When you do see it, it's more often at restaurants and large outdoor events, where poultry is undercooked because of time constraints. Less common is cross-contamination by preparing food - usually salad or other uncooked vegetables - on surfaces touched by uncooked poultry.

Salt is turning out to be less of the demon it was once thought to be. Obviously, too much isn't good for you, but research doesn't support the idea that salt causes hypertension. It may "unmask" early hypertension, but repeated studies have shown that reducing salt intake - even severely restricting salt intake - doesn't cure hypertension, although it can postpone the need for medication for a year or two.

Alcohol, on the other hand, is involved in at least half of all ER visits, at least peripherally. And if you just look at trauma, it's probably involved in well over half. Holidays are accompanied by a sharp uptick in visits for alcohol poisoning, as amateur drinkers try to keep pace with the professionals. And adding alcohol to an already tense family gathering can lead to anything from heart attacks to serving fork puncture wounds (saw one of those last Thanksgiving).

But alcohol withdrawal? It takes more than a weekend of "heavy drinking" to put you in danger of alcohol withdrawal. That takes more of a week-long bender sort of drinking. Not to say that people don't end up with hangovers that make them wish they were dead, but true alcohol withdrawal takes more drinking time to develop. Still, if that's your excuse for a Black Friday mimosa or Bloody Mary, I won't spoil it for you.

Happy Thanksgiving!



Jim
 

·
Spellign Bee Champ
Joined
·
15,336 Posts
What about sugar?
I'm surrounded by people with diabetes so I get to corner the desserts, unless they're sugar-free.
I'm 47, don't drink nor smoke, but I eat chocolate and sugary treats like I'm seven.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,243 Posts
What about sugar?
I'm surrounded by people with diabetes so I get to corner the desserts, unless they're sugar-free.
I'm 47, don't drink nor smoke, but I eat chocolate and sugary treats like I'm seven.
Excess sugar undoubtably causes more medical problems than excess salt. Mostly it's related to obesity, but there is some indication that sugar (sucrose) is a problem all by itself.

And don't buy the nonsense that "cane sugar" is better for you than "high fructose corn syrup" - both are broken down to equal amounts of glucose and fructose, and fructose is the suspected "bad guy" in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Also, don't use "agave syrup" - that is 100% fructose.



Jim
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,417 Posts
Just remember what your mother told you, moderation and you'll be fine. It's the extremes that get you.
 

·
Skeptical of Everything
Joined
·
3,655 Posts
Salt & Alcohol?

Sounds like the perfect excuse to fire up the blender.

 

·
Spellign Bee Champ
Joined
·
15,336 Posts
Excess sugar undoubtably causes more medical problems than excess salt. Mostly it's related to obesity, but there is some indication that sugar (sucrose) is a problem all by itself.

Jim
Thanks, Doc. Weight has never been an issue for me but I'll take it easy tonight.

Just remember what your mother told you, moderation and you'll be fine. It's the extremes that get you.
Glad you mentioned that. My mom never forgets to remind me every single time we talk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
Salt is the biggest food additive after sugar. If you eat a lot of processed foods you will not need salt.
IMHO it's not what you take in but what you burn off. I like pastries and snack cakes but I am pretty active-I bicycle to work, e.g.
 

·
Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
Joined
·
3,027 Posts
Salt & Alcohol?

Sounds like the perfect excuse to fire up the blender.
As a die-hard cocktillian, I have to protest your suggestion to "blend" margaritas. Unless you are a 19 year-old sorority girl using a corn-syrupy "Jose" mixer, a proper margarita should just be shaken.

A margarita is just a variation on the 2:1:1 Sidecar riff, but with tequila, lime and a salted rim (instead of the sidecar's cognac, lemon and sugared rim).

2 oz blanco 100% agave tequila
1 oz fresh squeezed lime juice
1 oz Cointreau

Shake well over ice and strain into an old fashioned glass with salted rim and containing fresh ice cubes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,561 Posts
...And don't buy the nonsense that "cane sugar" is better for you than "high fructose corn syrup" - both are broken down to equal amounts of glucose and fructose, and fructose is the suspected "bad guy" in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Also, don't use "agave syrup" - that is 100% fructose.



Jim
That isn't quite correct. Sucrose is composed of one glucose molecule connected to one fructose molecule. It is the simple basis for plant-based energy storage (larger scale energy storage is the formation of starch which is an all glucose-unit polymer). Breaking down sucrose gives back one molecule of each.

What high fructose corn syrup does is isomerize (chemically rearrange) some of the glucose into fructose. Why? Because people perceive fructose as sweeter. So HFCS is more like 45% glucose, 55% fructose. Not hugely different from 50:50, but still different.

Why does this cause a potential problem? The body regulates sugar levels by accounting only for the blood glucose level (since natural sugars give a 1:1 ratio). This means the body is responding as if there is actually less sugar in the bloodstream which sparks increased appetite and leads to fat storage. (a similar appetite effect happens with artificial sweeteners, when the body doesn't sense the blood sugar level it was expecting from sensing sweetness)

That said, I don't think there is anything wrong with HFCS or sugar, but the consumption level in the typical American diet is way too high. Excessive sugar is added to nearly all prepared foods (spaghetti sauce and catsup are two examples that are generally loaded with sugar).

In real life, I am a professional mad scientist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,243 Posts
That isn't quite correct. Sucrose is composed of one glucose molecule connected to one fructose molecule. It is the simple basis for plant-based energy storage (larger scale energy storage is the formation of starch which is an all glucose-unit polymer). Breaking down sucrose gives back one molecule of each.

What high fructose corn syrup does is isomerize (chemically rearrange) some of the glucose into fructose. Why? Because people perceive fructose as sweeter. So HFCS is more like 45% glucose, 55% fructose. Not hugely different from 50:50, but still different.

Why does this cause a potential problem? The body regulates sugar levels by accounting only for the blood glucose level (since natural sugars give a 1:1 ratio). This means the body is responding as if there is actually less sugar in the bloodstream which sparks increased appetite and leads to fat storage. (a similar appetite effect happens with artificial sweeteners, when the body doesn't sense the blood sugar level it was expecting from sensing sweetness)

That said, I don't think there is anything wrong with HFCS or sugar, but the consumption level in the typical American diet is way too high. Excessive sugar is added to nearly all prepared foods (spaghetti sauce and catsup are two examples that are generally loaded with sugar).

In real life, I am a professional mad scientist.

The big problem with fructose is that the body has limited ways of dealing with it. A small amount can be pushed into the glycolysis pathway by phosphorylation to fructose-6-phosphate, but the rest ends up being converted to triglycerides in the liver. This leads to hypertriglyceridemia, which is thought to be one of the causes of metabolic syndrome.

Animal studies have shown that fructose - in large amounts - leads to insulin insensitivity, which is one of the key features of type 2 diabetes. Even though the studies are typically done with a fructose in vast excess to glucose, there are a few studies showing the same results, to a lesser degree, when glucose and fructose were roughly equal, as they would be with sucrose or HFCS.

Bottom line: too much sucrose or HFCS can lead to problems. This appears to be true even if body weight is kept under control by exercise, since the fructose ends up as triglycerides even if the calorie balance is neutral (i.e. there is no weight gain). Again, everything in moderation, even moderation. I agree completely that processed foods are typically over-salted and over-sweetened; this seems to be a way of masking their lack of flavor.



Jim
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top