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Yep and it cost my dad $40 to fill his oil tank downstairs. Yeah we made far less but prices didn't triple ten times over in the "olden days" Oh yeah almost forgot 10 cents for a tube of Daisy BBs. Did that make for a fun afternoon.
Wow I remember Daisy bb's in a tube. 10cents for a small tube a 25 for the big tube. At Sprouse Ritz or TG&Y or Gambles. Yellow front.... sigh

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I'm 66 and still live within two miles of the house i grew up in. I remember "penny candy" that really was a penny. I remember having a wagon full of "pop bottles" and feeling rich. The local movie theater had Saturday afternoon shows that cost a dime for two movies, plus cartoons and you got a bag of popcorn ... your "Coke" would cost you another dime.

I remember the local hardware store selling shotgun shells as singles ... 20 gauge were seven cents apiece and 12 gauge were 10 cents. Twenty-two shorts were .45 cents a box of fifty for my Winchester single shot (that I still have). My first car was a '67 four door Chevy 300 (a four door Malibu), with a three speed on the column, that I paid $400.00 for and gave away to a friend when I went into the Navy in '74 ... he drove it for over five years.
 

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I must have been more fortunate than what you guys have mentioned you experienced growing up. I will be 74 in August and got to spend my first 12 summers with my grand parents east of Amber, Oklahoma, pretty much central Oklahoma, just a little south and west of OKC. I remember sleeping in my grandfathers arms as he sat on his horse-drawn mower, plow, hay rake, and other implements and operated them behind his team. (He got his first tractor in 1953.) I remember that red-eye gravy was one of the best tasting things on a cold winter morning when we spent the weekend with them. I remember walking three miles out to check on and count his cows every evening during the summers. Granddad made the first kite I ever had from brown wrapping paper from the dry-goods store and the frame was from slender branches he cut from a tree. He used flour past for the glue to hold it together and the kite string was from the string my grandmother saved from the wrapped up dry goods tied end to end for about 200 feet. The kite tail was from strips torn from threadbare sheets she saved, just because. When I was old enough I got flogged every day by setting hens when I gathered the eggs. The meanest old rooster chased us every time we went to the outhouse during the day, but it was too scary at night because it was fifty yards from the house. My grand parents raised cattle, hogs, chickens, wheat, cotton and a huge garden every year. They had to massive fruit orchards with most of the popular fruits in them. I thought they were rich because they had so much of what it took to live. My grandmother made me shirts out of flour sack every summer and I wore them with pride because she loved me enough to make them for me. I learned to drive my granddad's old 1949 Studebaker pickup out in the cow pastures. I was so short I had to look through the steering wheel out over the hood and I had four JC Penny and Sears Catalogs behind me so I could reach the clutch, brake and gas pedals. I drove across those pastures and down into the buffalo wallows and up out of them fast enough to get the front wheels off the ground till my grandmother told me to slow down. We often went to the cellar when the weather was bad and sat on wooden benches in front of all the shelves of canned fruit and vegetables my grandmother put up every fall. That stuff lasted forever as far as I knew. I remember often seeing from the corner of my eye a bull snake sticking his/her head out from between the jars and flicking its tongue just inches from my face. I really did not care for that old dirt cellar but there were always tornados during the summer in that part of the country. I always hated to go home to Ardmore when it was time for school. Living in town just was not as much fun as living way out in the country. I still have the old Meiers Broadcast radio that was granddad's . It is full of vacuum tubes and was powered by the six volt battery he would take out of his pickup and hook up to the radio so he could listen to it. So life is really a lot different now than then for me. And for your computer nuts, I remember seeing OU's first full size computer, called Osage, I think (maybe) on Saturday morning in the spring of 1965 when a buddy and I went up there to take the ACT test for getting into college. It was big enough to fill the whole room they built to house it. It was full of vacuum tubes, too, and was so massive. We really have seen a lot of change, haven't we?
 

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The movie house on Ave. C Manhattan NYC was 10 cents, and 7 movies were played. Rats got in for free, scary having those critters running around.
Lunch Box chocolate bars with almonds was 3 cents which was a good choice when you didn't have a nickel.

Lastly and most importantly the media is full of stuffing. I retired 1200 miles south of NYC when I retired. I went to an awards dinner for the Florida Gator Cup. The announcer asked for a moment of silence while we had a prayer before dinner. You could hear a pin drop while we prayed in silence. It brought tears to my eyes, I loved being able tp pray in public. Remember The NY Times front page, "God Is Dead." BS, he's doing fine here in Florida, and I'm sure in many more places where the media ain't brainwashed folks.

As far as the younger folk go, there's many fighting for us right now. Prayers sent to those freedom fighting troops. Amen!
 

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I’m not as old but I remember 50¢ movies, 1¢ candy and 5¢ soda water. We felt like outcasts because our parents divorced in the mid 60s. I also remember segregation and hearing that ugly “N” word a lot. We lived poor. Latch key kids. I didn’t get to live the dream but I’m glad so many others did.
 

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Don’t forget milk delivered to your doorstep in real glass bottles. You had these little cardboard things that had all the possibilities that could be delivered to your doorstep and you left the ones sticking out of the used bottles that you wanted. I used to sneak out and put the chocolate milk tab up. I also remember the first time I could not find a quart of oil for less than $0.55 per quart. I spent a half a day trying to find oil cheaper. Never did. I'll turn 75 next month and it’s sad to see the current state of affairs. I’m glad I grew up in simpler times.
 

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I can remember the phone on the wall. Crank it long enough an operator would come on. It was a shared line, so one ring was for someone, 2 for someone else, 3 and so on. Some times while on the phone someone along the line would pick up and crank their phone, then realize someone was on it. Oooops. Lived on a gravel road. Hardly ever see a car go by. Lived on a farm. We played outside, never inside. Ride the horse or chase chickens, catch one, climb to the top of the barn with it, toss it off and watch it crash land. Great fun. Go to the pond at night a catch frogs. Had a black and white TV, 3 channels and it went off the air around 11pm, or something like that. Just a "test" pattern. Only got a "pop" or ice cream when we went to the drug store. I'm 74. I wish I was 7 again!
 

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I can remember the phone on the wall. Crank it long enough an operator would come on. It was a shared line, so one ring was for someone, 2 for someone else, 3 and so on. Some times while on the phone someone along the line would pick up and crank their phone, then realize someone was on it. Oooops. Lived on a gravel road. Hardly ever see a car go by. Lived on a farm. We played outside, never inside. Ride the horse or chase chickens, catch one, climb to the top of the barn with it, toss it off and watch it crash land. Great fun. Go to the pond at night a catch frogs. Had a black and white TV, 3 channels and it went off the air around 11pm, or something like that. Just a "test" pattern. Only got a "pop" or ice cream when we went to the drug store. I'm 74. I wish I was 7 again!
We had a "partyline" but it wasn't the crank type.
Remember when votes were counted by hand and every party pitched in to help? My mom was an election judge. And going to the rexall drug store for ice cream or my dad taking us to the drive in.

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Lots of good stuff, especially the main post. It's a crazy world. Stuff now that is not normal, nor ever has been, the liberal news networks try to convince us it is. Politicians even try to do the same, but only do so, so they will get votes, because they also know the difference between normal, or not, just too CS to say so.Values & manners have been flushed down the toilet, criminals don't think it's fair to be arrested, & liberal governors don't think criminals belong in jail. Our Constitution is being burned everyday by folks that think freedom of speech is only revelant if it's them speaking, but no one else. Freedom of the press is abused daily by networks that are more concerned about telling you opinions, & not facts, or only reporting facts that support their opinions. WW 2 vets are considered the "greatest generation", & are more so now than ever, because they supported things that were real, & backed that support up with their lives.
 

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I'm 71 ... I've lived it and It saddens me to see what we have become ...
The only part I can't understand is why have our leaders brought us down this road to destruction and why does the media help them ?
The truth about “why” the leaders and the media are leading us down a path of certain destruction is more diabolically evil than most people can handle. Even when I tell people they can’t handle how wicked these people are. I’m 52, and I’ve spent tens of thousands of hours researching “why”. Folks older than me are not able to deal with the reality
 

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I must have been more fortunate than what you guys have mentioned you experienced growing up. I will be 74 in August and got to spend my first 12 summers with my grand parents east of Amber, Oklahoma, pretty much central Oklahoma, just a little south and west of OKC. I remember sleeping in my grandfathers arms as he sat on his horse-drawn mower, plow, hay rake, and other implements and operated them behind his team. (He got his first tractor in 1953.) I remember that red-eye gravy was one of the best tasting things on a cold winter morning when we spent the weekend with them. I remember walking three miles out to check on and count his cows every evening during the summers. Granddad made the first kite I ever had from brown wrapping paper from the dry-goods store and the frame was from slender branches he cut from a tree. He used flour past for the glue to hold it together and the kite string was from the string my grandmother saved from the wrapped up dry goods tied end to end for about 200 feet. The kite tail was from strips torn from threadbare sheets she saved, just because. When I was old enough I got flogged every day by setting hens when I gathered the eggs. The meanest old rooster chased us every time we went to the outhouse during the day, but it was too scary at night because it was fifty yards from the house. My grand parents raised cattle, hogs, chickens, wheat, cotton and a huge garden every year. They had to massive fruit orchards with most of the popular fruits in them. I thought they were rich because they had so much of what it took to live. My grandmother made me shirts out of flour sack every summer and I wore them with pride because she loved me enough to make them for me. I learned to drive my granddad's old 1949 Studebaker pickup out in the cow pastures. I was so short I had to look through the steering wheel out over the hood and I had four JC Penny and Sears Catalogs behind me so I could reach the clutch, brake and gas pedals. I drove across those pastures and down into the buffalo wallows and up out of them fast enough to get the front wheels off the ground till my grandmother told me to slow down. We often went to the cellar when the weather was bad and sat on wooden benches in front of all the shelves of canned fruit and vegetables my grandmother put up every fall. That stuff lasted forever as far as I knew. I remember often seeing from the corner of my eye a bull snake sticking his/her head out from between the jars and flicking its tongue just inches from my face. I really did not care for that old dirt cellar but there were always tornados during the summer in that part of the country. I always hated to go home to Ardmore when it was time for school. Living in town just was not as much fun as living way out in the country. I still have the old Meiers Broadcast radio that was granddad's . It is full of vacuum tubes and was powered by the six volt battery he would take out of his pickup and hook up to the radio so he could listen to it. So life is really a lot different now than then for me. And for your computer nuts, I remember seeing OU's first full size computer, called Osage, I think (maybe) on Saturday morning in the spring of 1965 when a buddy and I went up there to take the ACT test for getting into college. It was big enough to fill the whole room they built to house it. It was full of vacuum tubes, too, and was so massive. We really have seen a lot of change, haven't we?
Grew up on a farm in a very rural area, mountains and valleys in western PA, I'm 66. We had nothing but we had everything. We sat down at the dinner table, together for every meal, three times a day. I watched mu father farm and hold down another job and my mom stay at home to take care of US. My first 10 years were with outdoor plumbing and a coal/wood fired cookstove to heat the first floor of a limestone framed house. We made up games to play, roamed the farm and the mountain, what a glorious childhood. We had a party line phone which featured neighbors who listened in to every call and commented on your conversations. We tended the cattle, milked the cows twice a day. Baled hay and straw, had great fun building tunnels in the haw mow stacking the bales in odd formations to funnel you as you crawled through them in complete darkness. Shot pigeons that fouled the hay with a cadet, single shot 22 and became proficient. We had nothing but we had it all. Progress eventually found the valley, cell phone towers are now seen as are children and grandparents glued to their cell phones. The back porch sported several long guns in their places, loaded and ready to go. Groundhogs, pigeons, raccoons, foxes, deer (in season) and other wildlife beware as you were game to us. I played on the 1st little league baseball team in the area (all star). We had nothing but we had everything, we had a complete family, loved each other and had God in our lives. Went to church three times a week. We visited with our neighbors on weekends or evenings, had dinners, desserts, all kinds of great food. We grew our own food, big garden, green beans, limas, sweet corn, and fruit trees with the largest apples I've ever witnessed. Without all the modern conveniences we somehow made it to the future of this day and age to see the destruction our "leaders" have brought us. Waste, waste, waste. Disrespect, dishonor, no honor, no respect. Yes, they were the good ole days. The changes in our lives were astonishing but also unnecessary. Convenient but wasteful. It brought us so much saved time that today we have no time left seemingly. I'd go back in a second to meet my wife of 45 years again. Her natural beauty surpasses all the fakeness of todays female form. I could go on but will end it here. I'm on the backside of the hill as we used to describe "old folks". I fear what my children and grandchildren are faced with. I suspect I know but won't speculate. They won't witness what we did, it will be worse. Yes, no outdoor plumbing and missing it........
 

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I"m 75 and I remember when I could leave my bicycle in the front yard all night and guess what.???? Next morning, it was STILL THERE.. In the summer time, we slept with our windows open and the front screen door was never locked.

I also remember when I was seven years old, I would save my weekly allowance of .25 cents and buy a box of .22 short ammo. My dad would let me take his single shot bolt action and go squirrel hunting. Try giving a seven yr old kid a gun today. .
 

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One evening a grandson was talking to his grandfather about current events.
The grandson asked his grandfather what he thought about the shootings at schools, the computer age, and just things in general.
The Grandfather replied, "Well, let me think a minute, I was born before; '
'polio shots
' frozen foods
' Xerox
' contact lenses
' Frisbee's and
' the pill.
There were no: ' credit cards
' laser beams or
' ball-point pens.
Man had not invented : ' pantyhose
' air conditioners
' dishwashers
' clothes dryers
' and the clothes were hung out to dry in the fresh air and ' space travel was only in Flash Gordon books.
Your Grandmother and I got married first, and then lived together. Every family had a father and a mother Until I was 25, I called every woman older than me, "ma'am". And after I turned 25, I still called policemen and every man with a title, "Sir."
We were before gay-rights, computer-dating, dual careers, daycare centers, and group therapy.
Our lives were governed by the Bible, good judgment, and common sense.
We were taught to know the difference between right and wrong and to stand up and take responsibility for our actions.
Serving your country was a privilege; living in this country was a bigger privilege...
We thought fast food was eating half a biscuit while running to catch the school bus.
Having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with your cousins.
Draft dodgers were those who closed front doors as the evening breeze started.
Time-sharing meant time the family spent together in the evenings and weekends-not purchasing condominiums.
We never heard of FM radios, tape decks, CDs, electric typewriters, yogurt, or guys wearing earrings.
We listened to Big Bands, Jack Benny, and the President's speeches on our radios.
And I don't ever remember any kid blowing his brains out listening to Tommy Dorsey.
If you saw anything with 'Made in Japan ' on it, it was junk.
The term 'making out' referred to how you did on your school exam.... Pizza Hut, McDonald's, and instant coffee were unheard of.
We had 5 & 10-cent stores where you could actually buy things for 5 and 10 cents.
Ice-cream cones, phone calls, rides on a streetcar, and a Pepsi were all a nickel.
And if you didn't want to splurge, you could spend your nickel on enough stamps to mail 1 letter and 2 postcards.
You could buy a new Ford Coupe for $600,... but who could afford one?
Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon.
In my day: "grass" was mowed, "coke" was a cold drink, "pot" was something your mother cooked in and "rock music" was your grandmother's lullaby.
"Aids" were helpers in the Principal's office,
"chip" meant a piece of wood, "hardware" was found in a hardware store and "software" wasn't even a word.
And we were the last generation to actually believe that a lady needed a husband to have a baby.
No wonder people call us "old and confused" and say there is a generation gap, or from the archives.
How old do you think I am?
I bet you have this old man in mind....you are in for a shock!
Read on to see -- pretty scary if you think about it and pretty sad at the same time .
Are you ready ?????
This man would be only 70 years old today.
GIVES YOU SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT....
PASS THIS ON TO THE OLD ONES,
THE YOUNG ONES WOULDN'T BELIEVE IT.
That way of life went the way of the DODO and Wally Beaver decades ago....
 
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