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Discussion Starter #1
That's the only way I can see it, something has to be wrong with me.

Shooting is one of my favorite outdoor activities. Rarely does a day go by that I don't think about it to one extent or another. All throughout the week, Monday through Friday, I'd like to just take a break from work and obligations and do some target practice.

And then around comes the weekend, and when the opportunity to do just that is perfect I find myself not in the mood to actually do it, and unable to muster the interest to even leave the house. It's as if I have no life left in me because I spent everything during the work week, leaving nothing but a withered husk for the weekend.

I never used to be like that. Even just two years ago I would've been out shooting at any good opportunity. So obviously something's wrong with me, but I don't know what it is.
 

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I go fishing when that happens or get back into the reloading process.
 

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Corps Commander NGV
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Have that exact conversation with your doctor. He can work with you to get "the old you" back. I have felt the same thing. Depression is real, and what you describe is something many people deal with.
 

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Cat Herder
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Have that exact conversation with your doctor. He can work with you to get "the old you" back. I have felt the same thing. Depression is real, and what you describe is something many people deal with.
And with all this COVID stuff it is definitely on the rise among people. I'm not sure what your work is, but I'd bet that it isn't any easier now and probably has less social interaction.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Have that exact conversation with your doctor. He can work with you to get "the old you" back. I have felt the same thing. Depression is real, and what you describe is something many people deal with.
If that really is the situation then it's not an option that I have. There's a constant push by elected officials to have mental health records weaponized and used against members of the public who seek help for anything, even something as benign as insomnia.
 

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You are not alone. Exercise helps as does getting sunshine. You'd have to be a REALLY optimistic (as in Pollyanna-like) to not be depressed with all the crap going on. For a long time the way of life and rules we grew up with have been under attack from within. So, painful and potentially dangerous as your feelings are, your reactions are not irrational. Everyone has to deal with this as best they can.
 

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I walk 4 miles a day and that helps my mental state and gives me more energy. Kick your butt out the door and start with a two mile walk and see if that doesn't help. Not sure what you do for work but try walking at lunch if that is an option. If not then after work to get the stress out and forget about the place. If that doesn't help then talk to your Dr. and share your concern about the mental health records. Many of the Dr.'s are friends of gun owners.

I suspect your daydreaming about shooting is just an escape mechanism to take you away from an unpleasant work situation. Not sure how long to retire but if it's several years then time to move on once the economy is back up and smokin hot. You could use the interim time to seek training for either a new career or to grow in your current one. If you are close to retirement then don't let them force you to leave, document, document.
 

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You know you want to shoot. You know it helps. When you have the opportunity and "don't feel like it", DO IT ANYWAY! Once you get started, you will feel better for having started and this will help your mood.

Same thing is true of exercise. Most people don't exercise because they are "worn out". I have found that once you start exercising, you will find you have the energy to continue, assuming there is not an underlying physical condition.

Depression IS real, but it can be managed in most people without drugs of any kind through lifestyle and stress management. If that doesn't work, get help regardless of the perceived consequences. They are not as bad as the actual consequences of ignoring a real problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I walk 4 miles a day and that helps my mental state and gives me more energy. Kick your butt out the door and start with a two mile walk and see if that doesn't help. Not sure what you do for work but try walking at lunch if that is an option. If not then after work to get the stress out and forget about the place. If that doesn't help then talk to your Dr. and share your concern about the mental health records. Many of the Dr.'s are friends of gun owners.

I suspect your daydreaming about shooting is just an escape mechanism to take you away from an unpleasant work situation. Not sure how long to retire but if it's several years then time to move on once the economy is back up and smokin hot. You could use the interim time to seek training for either a new career or to grow in your current one. If you are close to retirement then don't let them force you to leave, document, document.
While good advice in general, the majority of it doesn't really apply in my situation. I'm nowhere near retirement age as I'm only in my mid 30s, and the work I do is very physically involved. It's a family handyman/jack of all trades business so there's a lot of walking, lifting, and being outside involved. We're the folks that get called when someone needs an air conditioner serviced or installed, if a water heater goes out, if a furnace doesn't want to fire up, or if a sewer line needs to be cleaned out, among other general day-to-day things necessary to keep people up and running. We're about as essential a business as can be found.

Unfortunately that kind of hard work takes a real toll on the body in short order when it's done on an almost daily basis. I don't know where depression ends and legitimate physical exhaustion begins. What I do know is that, some days when there's hard work and an opportunity to sit down and rest for even just a few minutes, I sometimes worry that if I sit down I won't be able to stand back up again, so often I'm on my feet for hours at a time.
 

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As a former rental furniture mover for 14 years and another 15 delivering and installing commercial personnel doors, I feel your pain. I stand by the fact that if you start, you will feel better once you get going. We all need to de-stress at times. I find shooting rejuvenating myself, but I no longer have a physically demanding job.
 

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Exchequer
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OP, you say something is wrong with you but you don't know what it is.

You spend your days working hard to help other people and fix their problems. You gotta take care of yourself too -physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually.

As has been previously suggested, maybe it'd be good if you talked to your doctor, your pastor, or a counselor trained to deal with these types of issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OP, you say something is wrong with you but you don't know what it is.

You spend your days working hard to help other people and fix their problems. You gotta take care of yourself too -physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually.

As has been previously suggested, maybe it'd be good if you talked to your doctor, your pastor, or a counselor trained to deal with these types of issues.
Unfortunately that's a little easier said than done in my case. I have no idea what's actually involved with taking care of myself beyond the basics. And when I think about taking the time to do stuff that I'd like to do, I sometimes wind up regretting even thinking about stuff like that. I end up feeling like I'm not doing enough to help out the family or other people. And granted, I could be doing a whole lot more than I currently am. The only way I can stop feeling that way is to stop thinking about stuff that I'd like to do for myself.
 

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You've asked for help. People have made some good suggestions. Your response every single time is to make an excuse as to why the advice won't work or doesn't apply to you.
 

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You've asked for help. People have made some good suggestions. Your response every single time is to make an excuse as to why the advice won't work or doesn't apply to you.
Isn't that how answers to problems are found out? A question is presented, general advice is offered, and details are gotten into?

Ngashooter, good advice about seeking medical expertise and suggests it might be depression. But not knowing what depression feels like there's uncertainty about how to approach the matter, and knowing what I do about the medical field I don't trust it to give me a straight answer. Doctors get kickbacks are prescribing medications that aren't needed, and pills are simple to prescribe in response to potentially complex problems. And as said, mental health records are constantly being sought for weaponizing against the public, so I'm already mistrustful of physicians. Turning to help from someone you don't believe you can trust isn't good for mental health either, is it?

Terry_p, good advice about exercising for improving mental health, as well as good advice for dealing with a hostile work environment. But I'm already getting exercise, infrequent as it may be, both on the job and off in the form of endurance training to help with the work I do. And the work environment isn't hostile, other than disagreements on how to do a particular task and the occasional aggressive animal that has to be dealt with.

Hlg, good advice on taking care of myself, not just those who call and need something done. Taking care of myself is honestly something that I don't know how to do beyond the very basics like hygiene, food, and rest. I'm on a constant code yellow state, waiting for the phone to ring at whatever time from somebody else needing something done and who knows what hour of the day, knowing that I have to be ready to go in a minute's notice. So even when I have downtime, I know it can be ended at any moment regardless of what day it is.

I'm not trying to be stubborn here. Not deliberately so anyway. In my mind I'm reading over these suggestions, weighing them with regard to my own personal situation, and trying to explain why I don't believe they would work; just like you would do in a medical consultation with a licensed physician.
 

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I know & at times have felt the way you do. I’m an automotive mechanic & I have a 89 year old mother that I take care of when I’m not at work. Between the two sometimes I feel smothered & bogged down. Usually when I go shoot, it’s a late & impromptu venture. My best friend works & has a young son & wife to deal with, he also has very little spare time. The range is about a 30 minute drive from my house, it’s an outdoor range so daylight is always an issue. I feel guilty when I go shoot but it doesn’t out weigh the satisfaction that I get when I do! I don’t have any “answers” or “suggestions” that are even worth mentioning, I’m not an expert on anything other than working on old wore out junk (work at an independent shop). Sometimes you just have to say fä#% it & pack up to make a quick range dash. My buddy & I say even if we only shoot one mag/cylinder, it’s better than not shooting a mag/cylinder. Times like these where ammo shortages are prevalent I really appreciate .22lr. I have stocked up on CCI Mini Mags & my Wrangler runs great with them. I’ll throw out some clay pigeons on the berm at the range & have a great time! When ever 9mm gets back in stock I’ll break out my PCC9 carbine again & ring some steel. For now I’ll shoot a few mags of 9mm out of one of my pistols just to shoot something other than .22lr. The last time I went, a few weeks ago; I brought my G30s for some .45acp action. It felt good ringing my gong with some .45’s! All work & no play makes Jack a dull boy. Don’t be Jack...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I suffer a general Burn out once or twice a year, These are tough times. When I get depressed I usually go to one of the Big Airports in Houston and sit for a good while watching planes come & go. Its Therapeutic. I find my way back to my normal activity.
Forget about shooting for a spell, find another interest. It will work out.
Dave
 

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You've received good advice here. Realize that taking care of yourself is the best way to help your family and your customers. Burning out either physically or mentally helps who? There will always be another job or someone in need, there is only one you. Take care of yourself!!! Physically, Mentally and Spiritually.

How? See a doctor or other specialist for how.
 

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When you have the time to go shooting but find you're not up to it...force yourself to go! Try it...you'll be glad you did.
 

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Mid 30's. Now I understand. My apologies for speaking the truth. You'll be okay. Here's a trophy.

Here's some more truth. If you go to a doctor to talk about this your life will change dramatically and maybe not for the better. The very first thing they'll do is prescribe some sort of psychotropic drug. The next thing that's going to happen is depending on where you live you may 'temporarily' forfeit your gun rights. Then someone will try and convince you you're disabled and you should apply for SSI. You'll spend the next few years spiraling further down into the morass you presently describe. Then you'll coast to the finish line in a prescription drug induced haze on a meagre stipend rationed by the government.

Or........you could understand that you're an adult and the choices you've made so far are what brought you to the place/circumstances you're presently in. You could make an adult decision and be grateful for your job, family and overall health or decide you want to make some changes.

The big problem is you're a millennial and you've been indoctrinated to believe life is without challenges. Now that you're facing some you don't know what to do. Here's what to do. If you REALLY need a doctor by all means go see one and do exactly what they say but don't start with a GP. Start with a counsellor that can't prescribe anything. Let them decide whether or not you need psychiatric help. Go somewhere to develop and appreciate a spiritual way of life that focuses on gratitude, selflessness and humility. You choose. Church, synagogue, mosque, sweat lodge, whatever. It's impossible to get mired in your own crap when you're practicing gratitude and more concerned about others than yourself. Eat a healthy diet. Get some exercise. Work is not exercise. It may be physical but it's not exercise. Doesn't have to be crazy. Take the dog for a walk every day. Anything besides work. Donate something. Time, money, whatever. Care about somebody or something else besides yourself.

Life is hard young man. Get used to it. We can whine and complain about it or we can do something about it. The biggest thing we can do is change our attitudes. We're either blessed or we're screwed. We get to choose. Nobody else can do that for us.
 
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