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When away from home, I lock my Honda Rincon through the ATVs frame. Pick a steel tube that is welded on both ends.

Be advised it is ridiculously easy to defeat most cables, locks, and chains and at least around me ATVs are stolen all the time.
 

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On another topic, the best ATV modification for any model is to put a double dose of tire "slime" in each tire. Buy it at a farm store, it is cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter #203 (Edited)
Nice! Now come join the Polaris atv forums too
That's a good idea. Will do.

Update hours later. Done. User name: Katahdin. No posts yet. Just going to read for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #204 (Edited)
On another topic, the best ATV modification for any model is to put a double dose of tire "slime" in each tire. Buy it at a farm store, it is cheaper.
So you recommend putting it in even before a puncture happens? That's an interesting idea. I did purchase a Slime air pump at the Tractor Supply shop (that I rode my ATV right to -- trail runs right to the shopping center it's in) and it came with one bottle. I'll have to pick up more. By double dose, do you mean a full bottle or more?

Re defeating the cable lock, in addition to it, which I've threaded through the frame on the rear, I've ordered one of those wheel locks like cops use to lock a car when the parking meter is expired. Redundancy won't necessarily stop a thief, but I'll make it hard as possible.

But for now, here at home base, I've got it so camouflaged in its "carport" (used a 9' x 9' camo tarp over a limb, then a green 5' x 7' over the ATV itself, then a camo net in front of it) that I doubt anyone is even going to know it's there. My walking stick gives it away in this image from a few feet away (harder to see from the trail itself), but that's temporary; I've even spray painted that propping pole with dark green. From the trail, over 100' away, it can't be seen at all from one direction, and barely from the other, but then only if one knows what one is looking for.

I've sat out there under the tarp relaxing while I designed and built it for over a week. I've noticed that not a single person ever even looks up that way because the trail is so rough there -- roots, rocks and ruts -- and on a sharp turn away that everyone is paying attention to navigating it (even the passengers) instead of looking around.

144661


From the trail.

144663
 

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So you recommend putting it in even before a puncture happens? ..................edited the rest
Yes, definitely install the Slime BEFORE you get a flat. It works good on holes less than 1/8 inch or so. I also carry gummy tire repair plugs, you can plug massive holes if you have enough of the strings. I ride where I hunt and it is full of thorns, Slime works well on thorns.

I buy it in the gallon jugs at Tractor Supply. I use about 1 quart in each front and 1-1/2 quarts in each rear. When you change tires out, you can scoop the Slime out of the tire with a plastic butter tub and put it back in the jug and reuse it on the next tires.

After the cheap stock tires wear out buy some 6 ply tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #206
Corndog, your idea sounds reasonable. But this FAQ by Slime raises some concerns for me. In particular, this statement.

"Will Slime damage my rims?

If pre-existing damage is present, we do not recommend using Slime. Do not leave Slime inside your tires for more than 2 years. After that time, we cannot guarantee the integrity of your rims. Slime’s Emergency Tire Sealant formula is intended to be used as a temporary emergency repair in passenger vehicles."

Response?
 

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I can see why some would, but I never did. I never wanted to get a puncture and not know about it.

Seems kind of strange to say, but I would rather be inconvenienced with a flat and have to deal with it in the field (which might be slime depending on where I am and the circumstances, than to get a puncture and not know it with slime and the temp fix slime becomes permanent fix slime.


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Discussion Starter #208
After the cheap stock tires wear out buy some 6 ply tires.
Do you like the Kenda Bear Claw EX? I'm finding them for $250 for a full set. That's way less than I expected, even doable soon.

Anybody know what the stock tires are? Guessing 2 or 3 ply.
 

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Corndog, your idea sounds reasonable. But this FAQ by Slime raises some concerns for me. In particular, this statement.

"Will Slime damage my rims?

If pre-existing damage is present, we do not recommend using Slime. Do not leave Slime inside your tires for more than 2 years. After that time, we cannot guarantee the integrity of your rims. Slime’s Emergency Tire Sealant formula is intended to be used as a temporary emergency repair in passenger vehicles."

Response?
I use the green Slime. I ran it for 5 years/5000 miles in my Honda Foreman with steel wheels. No issues. I had only 1 flat when I hit a sharp rock and put a golf ball size hole in my rear tire. It took a dozen plugs to make a get back repair. Tire was replaced.

I have Slime in my 2003 Honda Rincon currently. Aluminum wheels stock on this one. I have 17 years/13,000 miles on my Rincon. No flats. I pull thorns out of my tires routinely, the slime seals them immediately.

I put slime in the front tires of my New Holland tractor in 2001 when I brought it home from the dealer. Steel wheels. 2800 hours on the tractor. I use it on the farm I hunt that is covered with Osage Orange thorn trees.

The green Slime is meant to stay in tires and to be used as a preventative in off road vehicles that see lower speeds (like under 60 mph). It is not marketed to permanently repair car tires. I don't own any stock in the company. I will always use it.

As for tires. Most stock tires are bias and 4 ply. I wear them out, then switch to radial Maxxis Bighorn 1.0 tires in 6 ply. The radials ride wonderful and are very long lasting, even when run on gravel and asphalt roads (which kill most tires). I am on my third set of Bighorns and they are all I will buy. But they are expensive (around $125 per tire). The BH tires are non-directional treads, so you can rotate the tires from left to right side,, which reverses the rotation and evens out wear nicely. The BH has a nice tall lug, but is still fairly trail friendly. The best all-terrain tire I have found.
 

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I can see why some would, but I never did. I never wanted to get a puncture and not know about it.

Seems kind of strange to say, but I would rather be inconvenienced with a flat and have to deal with it in the field (which might be slime depending on where I am and the circumstances, than to get a puncture and not know it with slime and the temp fix slime becomes permanent fix slime.


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Here is why I don't follow that logic. ATV tires are meant to be run at around 4 to 5 psi. The slime is not holding back much air pressure. I consider it a permanent repair until the hole is big enough to need a plug. I carry gummy string plugs (about 20) on my ATV and a small compressor. I am blessed with extensive trail systems in Eastern Kentucky. Sometimes I ride very far from civilization or my truck. Failure is not an option for me in these trails, since on some rides we make big loops that will not have us back until close to dark. I carry gear to spend the night on the trail just in case, but it is not my preferred place to sleep at night.
 

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Discussion Starter #211
Corndog, thanks much for your very thorough responses. That's very helpful.

I'll look into the green slime (instead of the red or yellow? or is one blue?). I did some reading on the Slime site after your previous post (prior to the last two), and saw that they only recommended longer term preventative use in tubed tires. Of course, ATV's are (at least mostly) not. I used to run green slime in my bike tires as preventative, but they were tubed. Still, this bears more research for me, because I'm in your boat: potential long rides far from my starting point (one ride I've got my sights on in eastern Maine would take me a couple of days in to a camp), so failure is not a (good) option.

Re the Maxxis Bighorns: those look great. A bit wide for me for now -- I think I want to stay with more of a standard width for now, but I do want to go up to 25's (my 450 came with 24") -- and more importantly, probably not in my budget ... unless Uncle Sam comes through with that second stimulus check later this summer. Still, good food for thought, and I thank you for the info. I'll keep you posted about what I decide to do in both cases.
 
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