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hello ,I am brand new to reloading . I was thinking of starting to reload ammo . Of course ,I'm looking to spend the least amount of money . I have read reviews on the lee 1000 model . the reviews were very bad.. ON the other hand ,the reviews for the much cheaper classic turret were great . any suggestions would be appreciated thank you .
 

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I reload with a Lee Classic Turret press and have to say it's been a great press to learn on. It's faster than a single stage, but you still have one thing going on at a time. Once you get familiar with the process you can put out some ammo with this press. Once I get it set up for a caliber I run about 200 rounds an hour. You won't be saving a lot loading 9mm, but if you get into other calibers you'll save quite a bit. The classic turret press is a good way to get into reloading without going broke.
 

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I use a classic turret for all of my handgun bullets and have no complaints. I reload 9mm, 40s&w, 45acp, and 38/357 and all of my dies are currently set on extra turrets. all i have to do is change my powder measure and go. I have currently got my 9mm reloads down to $12.60 per 100. Thats like 52% of the cost to buy wwb at my loacal walmart after tax.
 

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Review the reviews

Welcome to reloading and thanks for asking our advice.
hello ,I am brand new to reloading . I was thinking of starting to reload ammo . Of course ,I'm looking to spend the least amount of money . I have read reviews on the lee 1000 model . the reviews were very bad.. ON the other hand ,the reviews for the much cheaper classic turret were great . any suggestions would be appreciated thank you .
There are many loaders who buy a press thinking it is a magical device that they put components in the top and cartridges come out the bottom. The Lee Pro-1000 ain't that press. Dillon 650 might be that press, but really, no press is that press.

The Pro-1000 takes more care than some, mostly because it is a progressive and they simply take more care. Partly because of the primer feed, spent primer handling, the fact that it is a three-station press (which allows no station for a powder check die or for separating the seating and crimping acts).

But it can serve well if you do your part.

Having said that, I am one who started with a single stage press, acquired two Pro-1000 presses and then moved "up" to a Classic Turret, becoming much happier for the change.

I never got used to trying to monitor multiple simultaneous operations, so part of my change from the Pro-1000s to the Turret is personal style.

But also, what makes the Classic Turret better in my mind, is the ease of caliber swaps (I load for a half-dozen). The base of the Lee Classic Turret is cast iron and has a rather robust ram. The Pro-1000 (and the Lee Deluxe Turret, also) base is aluminum, thus takes a bit more care to keep wear down. The Classic Turret drops spent primers down the center of the ram and into a flexible tube, where the Pro-1000 (and the Deluxe Turret, which uses the same base) drops them alongside the ram where they are supposed to bounce into a cavity in the press' base. They don't.

For a more complete picture, check out this thread.

Lee Pro 1000 Solutions < No Bashing > - THR

Good luck

Lost Sheep
 

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I agree 100% with Lost Sheep abut the PRO 1000.
I started out with one and have loaded around 13,000 rounds of 9, .38 spl, .40 and .45 ACP with it.
I made just about every newbie mistake that you can imagine while learning it but I've never had any serious problem or mishap.

You do have to watch, listen and feel every operation and stop immediately when something doesn't seem right.

The primer feed is probably the most problematic part. It needs a good supply in the tray to feed properly and reattaching the tray after refilling requires some manipulation.

You also need to remember that the PRO 100 is limited in the size of the rounds it can load.

MTH
 

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The primer feed is probably the most problematic part. It needs a good supply in the tray to feed properly and reattaching the tray after refilling requires some manipulation.
MTH
Paper clips are your friend. A partially straightened paper clip with a 1/8" right angle bend at the end will block the primers from flowing out while you mount the tray to the feed ramp. Hold the still curved part of the paper clip on the lid of the flipper tray with the right angle bend part blocking the outlet.

I also made a "Primer Pusher" out of another paper clip to assist feeding of the final few primers (which always gave me problems not feeding). Harder to describe, but easy enough to figure out if you have the press in front of you.

Lost Sheep
 

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I'm pretty new to reloading and have been using a classic turrent to load my 5.56 for about 9 months. I've decided to reload my 9mm as well. And as stated above, I purchased another 4 hole turrent and a set of LEE 9mm dies. And since my brother had given me and extra powder dispenser that uses the charge bar, I will just have to take one turrent out and put the other one in, and change out the shell holder. Makes it much easier to go from one to the other. I don't think you could go wrong with the LEE classic turrent.
 

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The Lee Turret Press would be a great press to start with hand loading. I don't reload to save money (it does help some though)... I do it for relaxation and to make a more consistent ammunition. Good luck with reloadin.
 

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I use a Lee 1000, and it works great, but it did take some work to get it like that (mainly the primer tunnel has some parting line in it that need smoothing).

It is dedicated 9mm press for me, the handgun ammo I load are 9mm & 45ACP, and you can buy extra die plates, but to switch from Lg. to Sm. pistol primers you have to take the lower end apart.

I started reloading to save money, but now I save money and produce consistant & accurate ammo.

Good luck with what ever set up you get.
 

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Larry the Conservative
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People load a lot of ammo with cheap equipment. That is a fact. The question is how much time you are willing to put into it.

With inexpensive equipment there will be functional problems that you will have to keep a eye on, things loosen up and must be re-tightened and there may be alignment problems with castings. Fit and finish on a $100 press is not going to be as nice as a $1000 press - this matters to some, not to others.

A lot of your happiness with a piece of any equipment is based on how little trouble you have with it. Progressive presses, by their very nature have a LOT of adjustments to keep track of and as a beginner reloader, I would never recommend a progressive press as a "first" press. The learning curve is steeper than you might think.

Some people do jump in with a progressive, but you sure see a bunch of guys at gun shows with these lower end machines for sale and if you manage to get them to open up to you, they'll tell you how much junk ammo they chunked out without getting one good round. These will be guys who thought all they had to do was to pull it out of the box, dump in powder, primers and brass and away they'd go.

It don't work that way. And the cheaper the progressive is, the more problems you have. The Lee 1000 starts at $197 at our LGS compared to the Dillon XL650 at $550. Then by the time you buy all the attachments, caliber change over or two, case feeder, etc., and the other tools you need to reload you are at $700-800 for the Lee or $1200-1300 for the Dillon. IF you decide that reloading is not for you, any Lee equipment has a resale value of around 30%, Dillon equipment sells on Ebay for 80-90% of retail. Just saying that there might be a reason.

The Classic turret is a much better choice for the beginner, but I'd ask around and find a local reloader who might be willing to show you his equipment and perhaps walk you through reloading. If possible find guys with Lee, RCBS and Lyman presses.

I use a Dillon XL650, RCBS Rock Chucker and a RCBS turret press for reloading. I think the price difference between the Classic Turret press and the RCBS Turret is around $25-35. A RCBS Master Reloader Kit that has almost everything you need to start reloading is on sale right now at Cabelas for $300.

The reason I keep a couple presses around is to set one up for just depriming cases. I clean my cases using a ultrasonic cleaner and having the primers out first lets everything get clean including those pesky primer holes.

WMMV

Larry
 

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hello ,I am brand new to reloading . I was thinking of starting to reload ammo . Of course ,I'm looking to spend the least amount of money . I have read reviews on the lee 1000 model . the reviews were very bad.. ON the other hand ,the reviews for the much cheaper classic turret were great . any suggestions would be appreciated thank you .
Cabela's has this on sale for $115

Lee Deluxe Turret Press Reloading Kit Item: IK-215922
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all for your information and experiences. It's been very helpful and im taking it all in.
 

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If I were a competitive shooter who went through 3 or 4 thousand rounds per week I might consider a progressive press. If you go through far less than that like I...a single stage or turret might serve you well. The turret having the potential for more rounds per hour while keeping things simple and less stressful. All I want is to safely meet my wife and I's shooting needs.
 

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Your going to need a good scale and a cronogragh so leave a little room in the budget for them.

Lee 1000 gets a bad name, but work really good once setup, there are lots of people using them. (I got mine on sale for $150 dies included midwayusa)

The Lee Turret should do well for a first press and may be all you need. I would not invest a grand into something without knowing for sure if it was for me and you have to load a lot of bullets to get that original investment back.

BTW I started on a rockchucker.
 

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I have loaded about 2000 rounds with my classic turret... (.40 and .38/.357). The press is plenty good for my purposes. I have the pro disc powder measure, which I would say is a must add-on. I have had no problems with the setup. I got a full kit from Kempf Gun Shop online. I since added a second turret and the .40 dies.

I do use the Lee factory crimp die in the fourth hole. I like it as well, especially for autos.
 
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