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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am one of those guys who enjoys tearing them down and cleaning em almost as much as shooting them....I am looking for some sort of spray or solution to clean out every nook an cranny to remove oil or what ever may collect in them, want to get it down to just the steel and put a fresh light coat of oil back on it...someone suggested using rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle or pour some in a small dish then soak the trigger assembly and hammer assembly to remove all that stuff...wipe it clean blow it out with can air, let it dry, then apply fresh oil and re-assemble for the frame they said they just use a cotton rag and Q Tips soaked with rubbing alcohol and wipe it clean, re-apply oil in the same manner.....I use to be a Electronics and Instrumentation Tech for a Sulfuric Acid Plant and when I cleaned my Rossi several months ago I used some electronics cleaner I had from when I worked at the plant, I used it to clean the Rossi and it did a great job dont have any more of the stuff so I was wondering about using rubbing alcohol, for the bore and chamber I use the normal gun cleaning stuff like Hoppes but for internal parts what do yall think about the alcohol to just strip away the old stuff before applying fresh
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
If my 357 had a side plate I wouldn't be asking but since the SP101 has trigger and hammer assembly and I don't want to tear them down just yet until I watch some more video's and read up some on it.....My Rossi is basically an old S&W so tearing it completely down is a breeze and you can clean each part, spring separately along with the inside of the frame.
 

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I'm not sure why you want to remove all the oil down to bare metal. You can shoot a lot of ammo in a revolver and never get any gunk or buildup in the trigger group, at least on a Ruger DA. I've put thousands of rounds through a GP100 and never, not once, had any residue in the trigger group.

There are several small springs and plungers on a Ruger (I can't speak to a S&W) that I like to have a light coating of oil in their channels. Hence, unless I do a complete strip down, I see no reason to remove all lube.

You can pretty easily remove the trigger group and drop it in a container of alcohol or whatever you like to strip it of oil. If I want to strip down to bare metal, I use Gun Scrubber or equivalent. You will have squeaky clean bare metal in no time.

Taking the trigger group apart is really not that difficult if you watch what you're doing and take your time. I usually have a 2 gallon zip lock I hold the group in just in case an errant plunger or spring decides to try to escape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I'm not sure why you want to remove all the oil down to bare metal. You can shoot a lot of ammo in a revolver and never get any gunk or buildup in the trigger group, at least on a Ruger DA. I've put thousands of rounds through a GP100 and never, not once, had any residue in the trigger group.

There are several small springs and plungers on a Ruger (I can't speak to a S&W) that I like to have a light coating of oil in their channels. Hence, unless I do a complete strip down, I see no reason to remove all lube.

You can pretty easily remove the trigger group and drop it in a container of alcohol or whatever you like to strip it of oil. If I want to strip down to bare metal, I use Gun Scrubber or equivalent. You will have squeaky clean bare metal in no time.

Taking the trigger group apart is really not that difficult if you watch what you're doing and take your time. I usually have a 2 gallon zip lock I hold the group in just in case an errant plunger or spring decides to try to escape.
The Ruger GP's and SP's seem to have a lot of springs in a compact area compared to older S&W and the older Rossi's that were made on S&W machines....My Rossi has a total of 5 springs in the entire gun....looks like the trigger assembly on Rugers have at least that many and they all are in a compact area,....prior to cleaning the Rossi a month ago it had been put up for at least 7 years and when I pulled the trigger it would rotate the cylinder on every pull but sometimes it would not bring the hammer back far enough before dropping it and when I opened it up I saw why..... it was cruddy inside.....I ve seen video's where they disassemble the entire guns and place them in a solution on some machine to clean them and I was just wondering if using alcohol or some other solution would do the same if needed to be cleaned that much.

My Ruger hasn't had more than150 rounds put through it yet and today its only a month old...I bought it new not used and I clean it after every use no matter how many rounds are fired, I like to keep it clean.....I let that Rossi go for to long, even back then I hardly cleaned it just a few drops of oil here an there...now I have always kept my rifles clean and shiny...they were my babies when it came to firearms.

I like the 2 gallon baggie idea, I will remember that one.......:cool:
 

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Sometimes we overcomplicate things. With primary components- frame and barrel, cylinder after stripping, ect, I put them in the sink and let the water get as hot as possible, spray on simple green, and scrub with a brush. Be SURE that no parts remain to be lost down the drain however. With the water hot, the parts pretty much dry themselves.

you don't need all that skin on your hands anyway.
 

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Yep. Two gallon. I learned the hard way when I was goofing around with my trigger group and inadvertently pulled back all the way on the trigger while not paying attention. One of the plungers popped across the room never to be found.

I guess my main points are that a thin coat of oil from wiping the parts down with a rag with a few drops of oil is all I ever have found a need for. Since the group is fairly dry, nothing ever builds up in that assembly, hence, I avoid stripping it to bare metal. If there is a bit of lint or something, it's easy enough to blow out with compressed air.

Also, after countless rounds, the trigger group on my GP100 (similar to your SP101) is pristine and spotless and looks brand new. No dirt gets in there (I will admit I've never dropped in dirt or sand). I think you'll find the same to be true.

And, if you do take it down to individual parts, it's not so hard to get it done. Just have that baggie....
 

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Speaking of your Rossi..... Nate Jones of SASS rossi fame suggests hosing down your firearms (wood and plastic removed prior of course) with aerosol brake cleaner. (the toxic one that CA doesn't allow if you get my drift, and not the politically correct environmental stuff) and it works like a champ.

As for the revolver: For me both when shooting gobs of black powder cartridges in SASS and afterwards and now when shooting only smokeless loads, WD-40. The way you described your needs is the exact same as the literature on the side of a can of WD-40. Clean and hose of the pudding out of your revolver and then wipe it down and air spray it as well during the wipedown. Cleans the internal as well as external areas and leaves a light coat of oil in the process. I swear by it. Smithy.
 

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Gun Scrubber... probably for sale at your range, its basically brake cleaner for guns. And although not necessary, the SP breaks down into big easy to clean chunks far easier than a Smith and Wesson, the manual shows you how. And you dont need to dissasemble your trigger group, it comes out as a unit you can spray down and blow off
 

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Speaking of your Rossi..... Nate Jones of SASS rossi fame suggests hosing down your firearms (wood and plastic removed prior of course) with aerosol brake cleaner. (the toxic one that CA doesn't allow if you get my drift, and not the politically correct environmental stuff) and it works like a champ.

As for the revolver: For me both when shooting gobs of black powder cartridges in SASS and afterwards and now when shooting only smokeless loads, WD-40. The way you described your needs is the exact same as the literature on the side of a can of WD-40. Clean and hose of the pudding out of your revolver and then wipe it down and air spray it as well during the wipedown. Cleans the internal as well as external areas and leaves a light coat of oil in the process. I swear by it. Smithy.
If WD-40 sits long enough it will get gummy and harden over time. The only time I'd ever use it on a firearm is if I get caught in the rain or drop it in a pond and even at that, I will strip it and completely remove all WD-40 afterwards.

It isn't a solvent. It isn't a lube. It is a Water Displacement product.
 

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Tumbleweed,

I just got a Highway Patrolman recently that was put away dirty after firing and sat for years.

I did what you want to do.

I stripped it down to bare metal, cleaned everything with just plain old Hoppes 9 solvent and toothbrush.

Then I dipped all parts in 90% alcohol and let dry completely.

Then I used 3-In-One dry lube for a lot of the parts, and regular Hoppes oil for rest, wiped off excess.

While I had it completely apart, I stoned machine marks and burrs.

It is absolutely beautiful now. Such smooth precise action.

No expensive gunk and gizmos, no wives tales, and this and that. Just back to the old basics.

Doc
 

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Gun scrubber, or if you don't have that, carb cleaner. I've used carb cleaner for years and it blasts everything off, carbon buiildup,powder residue and softens up what it doesn't blast away. BUT, DO NOT get it on any wood/plastic parts, it's also a great stripper! Learned that the hard way. I have a Taurus M65 I've had for about 25 yrs and I've only had to take the side plate off 3 or 4 times and that was to wipe off the internal parts and litely oil them. It just doesn't get dirty. I wouldn't constantly remove parts for cleaning unless its absolutely necessary,it can cause undue wear and tear on screw heads and moving parts.
 

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Hey there Tumbleweed! Unlike others who replied, I also like to clean the ever living crap out of my guns, so don't feel weird. Unlike Smithy however I DO recomend biodegradable materials.

Mix a solution (in spray or bucket) of an INDUSTRIAL strength, biodegradable cleaner like Simple Green, Purple Power, etc, and just dunk or spray the thing sans grips in the cleaner. Let it work for 1 hour if stainless or 15 min if blued, scrub, rinse and repeat as necessary's. Once done just use a water dispersing agent (WD40 is the norm but I just use mineral oil), let sit for 1hr, wipe off and then re-lube with your choice of oil/grease.
 
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