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New day, new favorite. All my Single-Sixes are blued with one exception ... my KNR-6. If I decide to carry a holstered Single-Six, this is the one I take. It was made in 1979 and had a rough life with many bricks of ammo run down the pipe .... so many rounds that the rifling was worn thin. I replaced the barrel, the worn-out pawl, the beat-up grips, and gave it a onceover with a buffing wheel 3-M pad. It now looks and works like a new gun.

 

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Here’s my favorite, my Dad gave it to me in 1973 when I was 13. It’s a 1969 that I love and wouldn’t trade for anything. I only have the 22LR cylinder and was going to send it to Ruger for the magnum years ago but I thought if this gets lost it would kill me. I’ll pick one up one of these days.
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No problems at all from mine and I definitely recommend them. Took me YEARS of searching to find one of these stainless 4.62" "Gunfighter" length models. I bought it "used" although the previous owner said he had only shot it once or twice so it looked showroom new. That same year, Ruger started making them again😖. Oh well, I still paid less than a new one.

 

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My New model first year of manufacture came with a fluted Mag cylinder, no 22 LR. 5.5 inch barrel, my preferred length. I bought an after market 22 lr cylinder which is not fluted. Kind of the opposite of the Ruger normal. The 22 LR accuracy is better than the 22 mag. Is it the RN lead bullets? The copper washed ones are fine in my 22 bolt action rifles, but not in the single six. 22 Round nose lead, cheap, on target , and I am a happy guy. My three screw safety modified by the factory doesn't care either way. 6.5 inch barrel and re blued by the factory. Pretty. It is more accurate than I can aim which is just fine by me.
 

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Crkckr, I had one like yours with the rough cylinders. I bought it when they first came out in 73. It was so bad I took it back to the GS and exchanged it for another. That one was just as bad and returned it for my money back. I think they were close to $120 then. I now have one that I got several years ago for 250 NIB. Its cylinders are smooth like they should be and its a beautiful gun. It is a 68- serial made in 81. I heard somewhere when Ruger first started with the stainless they over used their gang chamber drills too long thus causing the rough chambers. Also a lack of QC.
 

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Today's favorite Single-Six is my Ruger Colorado Centennial (RCC). It was made in 1976 and has a stainless steel grip frame with roll marked 22 LR and 22 Mag cylinders. I was living in Colorado when this gun was made so it has some special meaning to me. This is one of those "fondle but don't shoot" guns in my collection. I bought it with the normal cardboard box, the shipping sleeve and a Ruger presentation case, also in a cardboard box. Here's the RCC:


Here's the RCC in its presentation case:
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Today's favorite Single-Six is my Ruger Colorado Centennial (RCC). It was made in 1976 and has a stainless steel grip frame with roll marked 22 LR and 22 Mag cylinders. I was living in Colorado when this gun was made so it has some special meaning to me. This is one of those "fondle but don't shoot" guns in my collection. I bought it with the normal cardboard box, the shipping sleeve and a Ruger presentation case, also in a cardboard box. Here's the RCC:


Here's the RCC in its presentation case:
is the cylinder engraving from ruger? do you know which factory if so? very beautiful Iowegan!
 

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maddmatter, It's not really engraving ... it's a "roll mark", which is done like the printing on a barrel. The left side of the barrel is roll marked “1876 *Colorado Centennial*US Bicentennial*1776”. The butt of the grip frame is marked “1876 Colorado 1976”. Both cylinders have a roll marked Colorado mountain scene and the Bicentennial 76 logo. The basic gun is a blued NR-6 (6 1/2" barrel) with a stainless steel grip frame. Ruger made about 15,000 RCCs with a "76" serial number prefix so they certainly are not rare. At the time (46 years ago), a normal NR-6 sold for $129 and the RCC sold for $250 plus $100 for the presentation case.
 
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