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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
did you ever watch a youtube video where some tactical guy or gal is showing you how to draw a weapon, line up the sights, get on target and break the shot? where in those 3-4 seconds did you laugh to yourself and think, "your already dead"? "I hope everybody else that carries is that slow".

if your carrying, you've already made some decisions and realize the consequences. if you pull the gun out of the holster, the gun is going to go bang. it was your last resort and you used the tool to stop the threat. now call your lawyer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ftXWvkPj1k here's part 1 of a 2 part movie put out by the FBI back in the 50's. they're shooting revolvers but the ideas would work with a semi-auto. basically in combat the shooter is always watching the target(which might be moving and shooting). first fast shots can come from hip level, at greater distances the gun can come up into the line of sight, maybe even using the sights. the more a shooter practices the tighter the group will be in the silhouette. practice, practice.
draw and dry fire at home.

there is almost nothing learned in slow fire or bullseye shooting that transfers to defensive shooting. different sports.
 

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Yep it is what Rex Applegate wrote, "Bulleyes don't shoot back". I practice both disciplines...target and point shooting. As my eyes age the less of a good target shooter I am. However, the point shooting continues right on the money. Learned that skill in the Army a life time ago. Has continued to serve me well.
 

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Great post.
Holds very true today.
Thanks Mo
 

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I really don't see how that video or the practice session is helping officers that much. If I am shooting a course of fire with 8 targets I shoot the close target from the hip. But even if the second target is close when I make the transition to the second target I raise the gun to eye level. By the time I shoot the third target I have both hands on the gun. Every time I make a transition to another target I do something to improve my accuracy. If I move I reload my gun, even in the matches where you cannot reload on the move as a safety rule. Any match I shoot we only put 10 shots in a magazine so we have to reload. I don't see how just emptying your gun in a single target is a lot of help once you have become accustomed to shooting from that position.

Here at home when build a target stand it is made to hold two targets. To be sure a half crippled ******* doesn't have more resources than the FBI.

This is a typical target stand that I build. A sunglasses rack that was thrown away at a shopping center and scrap lumber I picked up at a construction site. Yup, I am a professional dumpster diver.

The targets in the background are nailed to brush I am trying to kill. Once you shoot a small tree down it seldom comes back. That area is actually going to be a shooting lane come hunting season.
 

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Yup, seen them. I also seen a couple where guys were trying to demonstrate their fast draw and shot themselves in the leg. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
old crow,
like your range and the way you practice and your having fun.
that video series is 1950's and dated. I don't use that "bowling alley" draw. I carry at 1, 1:30 and the gun just comes out and up a little for the first shot. with something like my P-89, that first DA shot is just a conversation starter, the rest shot SA are serious. for some reason, my j-frame is the fastest to get one on the target.
just for grins sometime, turn away from the target and shoot over your shoulder as you run away. (tactical retreat?) for old guys this could be a life saver. hehehehe.
 

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Thanks for finding that old video.
I enjoy watching how they used to teach.
In many instances, they still work today.
 

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Thanks for finding that old video.
I enjoy watching how they used to teach.
In many instances, they still work today.
It would work to get an inexperienced shooter started point shooting. Have the shooter draw and fire a few shots from the hip until he starts hitting the target.

Every weekend thousands of shooter all across the US sweep back a cover garment and draw their gun quickly without shooting themselves. There maybe two injuries a year in competitive shooting. Compared to any activity such as just crossing the street that is a remarkable safety record.

It is only dangerous to NAZI range masters who scream "no rapid fire, no shooting from the hip."
 

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there is almost nothing learned in slow fire or bullseye shooting that transfers to defensive shooting. different sports.
Since I have no place to practice drawing and shooting I'll save my money and stay home next time I want go to the range. Thanks for the advice!
 

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Since I have no place to practice drawing and shooting I'll save my money and stay home next time I want go to the range. Thanks for the advice!
Usually it is $20 entry fee to shoot in a match. You get to do everything you will do in a defensive situation. That is what got me started shooting matches. I could shoot over 80 rounds in a match and go through six courses of fire for $20. The same range charges $60 an hour to use the same facility by yourself. By participating in a match I save $40.
 

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Old Crow, I admitingly was being sarcastic, but I do appreciate that info. I believe there are one or two opportunities to enter matches around here, but its not close by plus inevitable traffic and my schedule. So when I go to the nearby "target" range, I go with the mindset that something is better than nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
draw and dry fire, practice all day without leaving the house. I can get away with shooting a co2 bb pistol in my backyard, great fun and good practice.

so, I see Kudz was checking out the old style "Tom Threepersons" FBI holster. a fitted leather holster("boned") for a double action revolver will not allow the cylinder to turn or gun to fire. I've seen 1911 holsters made the same way. cocked and locked is safe. I wouldn't recommend a holster like that for a Glock.
 
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