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[8D] I know everybody has some sort of little trick or method of doing their loads. Let's hear what yours is. I got carbite dies but I still lube my cases. Here's how I do it. Take a old plastic shoe box and put about 100rds in it and spray lightly with Hornadys One Shot. Roll the cases around, and back and forth a few times, and your good to go. Makes everything a lot eaiser.
Now what's your trick..[?][:eek:)]:D
 

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In the good old days with my Rock Chucker, I'd use the powder dropper to fill 50 cases-then inspect each shell with a flashlight-never had a double load or empty round that way.
 

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Same here Sheepdog and I used a slower powder which was easier to see. Started doing that after I saw that picture of the chiefs special in the speers no. 9??? . A guy at the cowboy range blew up an uberti about 2 years ago {not from a double, he used the wrong weight}. No injuries, the gun was a total loss.
 

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When I reload with carbide I litely lube every 9 or 10th case is plenty of lube you can tell when resizing. They say you don't need it but after a stuck case or two I don't agree. Phil
 

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I have never lubed my pistol cases when using carbide dies, and I have reload tens of thousands of rounds with zero problems.
 

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quote:Originally posted by gunman42782

I have never lubed my pistol cases when using carbide dies, and I have reload tens of thousands of rounds with zero problems.
+1

I've loaded a couple hundred thousand rounds of handgun ammo over the last 30 years. As long as the brass is clean and dry I've never had a problem loading with carbide dies and no lube.
 

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I have two types of loads. One for bullseye/benchrest and one for general purpose shooting. With my GP loads, I just run them through the Dillon 550. They come out every bit as good as factory ammo, probably better.

When I load for max accuracy, I do lots of extra stuff that most hand loaders would consider anal. I weigh each bullet and cull out anything more than .1 grains off. I measure each powder charge down to .05 grains. I use brass that has been fired 3 times or less. Each flash hole is inspected for proper diameter. And on and on. In pistol ammo, I can usually get the max velocity spreads down to 10 fps. In rifle, 25 fps.

My "trick" is not wasting time on precise accuracy when loading practice/plinking ammo. Not all ammo needs to be perfect. My GP loads take about 15 minutes per box whereas my precision ammo can take two hours for a box. Over the years, I have tested all sorts of reloading techniques and found out what works and what doesn't. Precision accuracy boils down to two things: selecting the right powder and uniformity.

The best "trick" in the book is to use a chronograph when working up loads. Keeping max velocity spread to a minimum is paramount. Making sure your loads track with the book is important too. By testing different variables, you can determine what powder, crimp, bullets, primers, cases, etc, works best.
 

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I work up all my loads with a chrono. I also don't max loads out, I just find a nice accurate one and stay with it.
 

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When I first started reloading 30/06's with a Lee Handloader, I didn't have any powder scales or chronograph. I loaded some full of IMR 4950 powder with 150 gr. bullets and they did ok. When I moved up to the 180+ bullets I noticed case problems. Lucky I didn't blow myself up. Now I weight the powder and watch the pressure.
 
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