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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to the forum. I bow hunt for moose each year in what used to be my home state of Alaska. A large caliber pistol is always on the belt of my backpack for bear protection. Currently I carry a S&W 329PD with a Trijicon RMR mounted on it. But having owned a couple of 480's, a 500 S&W, and one 475 Linebaugh I appreciate the added diameter provided by the larger-bored pistols. The pistol is to be carried a lot and shot very little. Being pleasant to shoot isn't important. Light weight, compact, useful in dark or day, and easy on my 62-year-old eyes are all desirable qualities.

I fully realize that the very short barrel of the Alaskan costs velocity and further that the muzzle blast would be awful. But again, with the notion that it's to be carried a lot and shot infrequently something smaller like that appeals. I want a DA pistol, not SA.

Now I'm considering a SRH Alaskan in 480 and I'd want to mount an RMR on it. However I can find no information regarding whether or not a ready-made mount for doing so exists.

Has anyone ever mounted an RMR on a SRH Alaskan? And if so, what mount did you use?

Thanks in advance for any input.
 

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Just my opinion, but I don't recommend mounting a pricey optic on a 480. The recoil on the 480 Alaskan is very jarring, and on mine, the rear sight cross-pin starts to walk out after firing about 40 rounds of typical Hornady factory ammo. I'd hate to think what it would do to something more delicate like a glass optic.
 

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Welcome to the forum John. I am more familiar with the Burris FastFire III, and it is tested to 1000 g's, and seem to hold up well on .500 S&W, and also on 12 Ga. 3 in mag slug guns. I would think the Trijicon would be at least as tough.
If your SRH has the Ruger scope ring scallops on it, there is a Burris mount , the #410332, listed as being for the Ruger77, Super Redhawk, Super Blackhawk Hunter ( and Mini-14/30 Ranch rifles).
Not sure if it would fit your SRH or not, sorry I couldn't be more help with RMR mounts.
 

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The Alaskan does not have integrated scope rings like the standard SRH's, as such, the standard options like the Burris FastFire mount 410332 don't work.

You can always have your Alaskan D&T'd, then use any number of mounts, but the only no-drill option for the Alaskans for a micro red dot sight like the RMR is the JP rifles JPoint sight base. It replaces the rear sight and uses the sight retaining screw. I have used this mount with an adapter plate to mount Burris FastFires on multiple 454c SRH's and have had no issue in thousands of rounds. The RMR may be heavier, so confirm the weight against the Burris, but the mounts have held up fine for me, and JP confirmed that they would replace my optic if the mounts ever fail - I have no reason to believe they ever will based on how well they have held up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys for the info. I looked at the JPoint sight base (based on an earlier google result trying to get an answer to this same question) but it wasn't clear to me how to mount an RMR on the JPoint base. Will it accept/fit the RMR?

Clearly drilling and tapping is an option but around here finding a good revolver smith is hard to do.

The 329PD with full house 44 Mag loads is almost as punishing to shoot as the 500 S&W I used to own. It's holding up with the RMR just fine so I'd guess a well-anchored base on the Alaskan 480 would work also.
 

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The RMR would require an adapter. JP Rifles doesn't make one, but Arredondo does:

Arredondo JP to RMR adapter

So... Buy the RMR, set it on top of an Arredondo adapter on top of a JP Rifles JPoint sight base (JPA-RR modified for SRH) and you'll have a no-battery variable illumination reflex sight on your Alaskan.
 

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What about buying a full sized gun and having the bbl cut down. That would allow you to use the ruger mounts and one of these:

Super Redhawk scopes mount WEIG-A-TINNY®

They make one specifically for the .480 and .454. Something similar to the Toklat model might also work for you. I think Magna-port makes a nice 4" version.

Food for thought; I hope it helps,

Matt
 

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There's really no reason to make this so complicated.

Way, way, way cheaper to have an Alaskan D&T'd than to have a 7.5" model cut down to 2.5" and milled for a front sight.

Plus, the Weigand mount would not work on an Alaskan clone. The mount extends past the end of the barrel, let alone the fact that it would require the cylinder frame mounted front sight be removed to install the mount. Cutting down a full barrel model would allow the use of the Burris FastFire 410332 mount, but for the cost, it wouldn't be worth it.

Using a JPoint mount and an Arredondo adapter plate puts you $80 into the mount. The Burris mount would need an adapter plate too, so it'd be the same price, and the Weigand mount costs $50 in itself. PLUS the cost of cutting down the barrel, likely around $150, and then milling a front sight mortise and installing a Ruger front sight - good for another $100 or more. $80 for the JP + Arredondo is a couple hundred dollars less than the barrel cut down, resight, and mount cost. It'd still be more expensive to have a D&T mount installed compared to the JP + Arredondo set up, as you'd have $25 per hole times at least 3 holes, plus the cost of a mount, which should run $40-50 itself. The Arredondo adapter might be kinda pricey, but in the scheme of what it lets you achieve, it's nothing - and really, If you think about it - two or 3 range sessions worth of ammo costs more than that mount set up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys for all of the input. And special thanks to Varminterror for point me toward the Arredondo adapter.
 

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I agree Varminterror,

If it were me, I would just get a Toklat and use a Burris or Weig-A-Tinny and call it good. I have an Alaskan and love the gun, but I don't think another 3" of BBL would realistically effect it's efficiency in the field. I know he is looking for a .480, but the .454/.45 Colt offers lots of different load choices that will be just as effective as the .480. If having a gunsmith D/T is a problem, then this is a plug and play way to get pretty close to the original idea.
 

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I agree Varminterror,

If it were me, I would just get a Toklat and use a Burris or Weig-A-Tinny and call it good. I have an Alaskan and love the gun, but I don't think another 3" of BBL would realistically effect it's efficiency in the field. I know he is looking for a .480, but the .454/.45 Colt offers lots of different load choices that will be just as effective as the .480. If having a gunsmith D/T is a problem, then this is a plug and play way to get pretty close to the original idea.
You'd be surprised how much difference there really is between the 4 SRH lengths. I have multiple SRH's, currently 4 Alaskans, 2 Toklat's, and 3 7.5" models, and have had a handful of others in the past as well (sad I sold a 1st run 480R 6 shot Alaskan AND a 2nd run 5 shot 480R Alaskan & 7.5"). There's a stark disparity between the handling and portability for the Alaskan with a micro red dot on a JP rear sight base vs. a 5.5" Toklat with a Weigatinny mount.

Plus, the Weigatinny mount kinda looks weird with a micro red dot sight on top. It's a pretty massive mount, which really reveals itself when you strap a tiny flea on its back.

For a standard non-Alaskan model, the Burris FF base or the JP are both good options. I have a hog hunting buddy that keeps a Burris FF base on his so he can leave the iron sights in place to be able to use the red dot as a semi-QD. I have a shim that sets under my rear sight so it goes back on to the same POI every time when I take the JP base and BFFIII off.
 

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A charging Bear in close at full speed would be quite a challenge with any optic mounted hand gun.
You must be quite the shot with a hand gun at moving bobbing targets. I would love to see the set up also.

That's a compliment please don't take it any other way.
 

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A charging Bear in close at full speed would be quite a challenge with any optic mounted hand gun.
You must be quite the shot with a hand gun at moving bobbing targets. I would love to see the set up also.

That's a compliment please don't take it any other way.
Here, I'll fix it for you:

"A charging bear, in close, at full speed, is quite the challenge with any weapon!!" ;-)

Have you fired red dots on handguns? They're miles faster than iron sights. "Optic" is a broad term. A scope or tube style red dot tends to be slow, but open red dots are the fastest sighting system available. They're a single plane sighting system - when sighted in, if the dot is on the target, it'll hit the dot. Comparatively, open sights are dual plane sighting systems - just like the red dot reticle, you have to put the front sight on the target, but UNLIKE the red dot, you also have to co-align the rear sight to the front to ensure the bore is pointing at the target. Telescopic sights - aka "scopes" have the same requirement - your eye must be aligned co-axially with the centerline of the erector tube to ensure parallax errors are eliminated, so you can't just put the crosshairs on the target - you have to align the scope to your eye. Red dots don't have that requirement - just put the dot on the target and pull the trigger.

That doesn't mean anyone will remember to LOOK AT THEIR SIGHTS instead of focusing on the 800lb freight train of teeth and claws bearing down on them (pun intended), and it doesn't mean that it's any easier to put the dot on a moving target (than crosshairs or front sight), but if they do, they can be faster with the red dot.
 

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I have an ultra dot-4 on my SRH 44 mag, and a Nikon red dot on my Mini, wife has one on her Mini30 I am quite familiar with how they work. They don't all hit just as long as the dot is on the target, most, not all.
The darn Nikon is costly $$$ and the dot must be centered, why they made it that way ?
don't know. It's a great red dot if you train your Eye to center the dot, kinda happens naturally, but under stress I wouldn't trust it.
Anyway You gave a great dissertation.

I was thinking more about what you said here V

That doesn't mean anyone will remember to LOOK AT THEIR SIGHTS instead of focusing on the 800lb freight train of teeth and claws bearing down on them (pun intended), and it doesn't mean that it's any easier to put the dot on a moving target (than cross hairs or front sight), but if they do, they can be faster with the red dot.
 

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For real threats at close distance I would go with something like the XS standard or Big dot, they make them for the Alaskan.

I've seen a rear sight mount for the Super Redhawk, I had a J Point mount for the GP100 which of course didn't fit the Super Redhawk, but a year or so ago I saw a mount made for the SRH. I had thought of putting it on my Alaskan .44, but then figured it would be a waste (for me) to spend the $4-500 for the mount and the Trijicon mini for a gun that spends 99.9% of it's life in the safe, so I figured some day I would just put the XS standard dot on it.
 

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The same JPA-RR fits the GP100, SRH, and SBH. A simple modification has to be done to adapt it to the SRH, but they only sell one base for Rugers.

I never found the Big Dot's faster than the Standard dots, but XS totally missed the boat by not making the rear sight tritium also. I wish they would have not gone with the broad V rear, it's not really of any aid in darkness, which is when you need tritium in the front. Why make the sights like that? :confused::(

I do a lot of handgunning for game, and my eyes have always sucked for iron sights. I love scoped handguns, but I hate carrying them, and if I'm only shooting 50yrds or less, I shoot plenty well enough to kill anything walking with a red dot. So I've tried a lot of different combinations of sights and mounts.

That's weird about the Nikon red dot. Which model? All of them drift a little as the dot leaves center, but usually not enough to make the difference in a vital miss vs. hit at defensive ranges (25yrds or less). I haven't ever used a Nikon red dot, guess I never will because I'll be avoiding them after hearing that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
This is what an RMR looks like on a 329PD:



I have owned or currently own multiple 44 magnums, two 454 Casull revolvers, one 500 S&W, one Ruger SRH 480, a Ruger SRH 480 with Wild West Guns Wolverine conversion (just like the current TALO Toklat), and one 475 Linebaugh custom built for me on a 44 Mag SRH Alaskan with custom barrel by Hamilton Bowen. After playing with them all I believe a 410 grain slug traveling at 1100 fps is perfect for what I want and need. It accomplishes everything I want in a defense stopping situation. A 480 is relatively pleasant to shoot when compared with a 475 Linebaugh full house and certainly more pleasant to shoot than a S&W 500. For what I want and need I believe a 480 Ruger is just about perfect. If the Toklat came in 480 and IF IT WAS LEGAL IN CALIFORNIA where I live I'd own one. And I'd put an RMR on top of it.

I lived in Alaska for many years, have killed or taken part in killing several brown bears, and fully appreciate just how much it takes to stay healthy if things get ugly. If I wasn't carrying one of my company's recurves I'd be carrying a big-bore rifle. But any pistol that you're carrying is better than any big heavy rifle back in camp if things go south.
 
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