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Discussion Starter #1
I hope this doesn't become a flame thread, that's not my intention. Rather I'm trying to understand trophy hunting. The desire, the motives, etc. For me hunting is about harvesting a resource, food, hide, etc. Knowing that meat doesn't actually come from the grocery store. If something ends up on my wall I'm fine with that too but that is always a secondary if it happens at all. If I'm not gonna eat it then I don't kill it, unless it happens to be about controlling an over-population problem in general, but even then I hope to actually do something with the harvest if possible. That's how I roll but I know some folks who are all about the trophy on the wall or popping varmints, wasted meat is of no consequence, something left for the scavengers. I have a hard time understanding that and was hoping some fellow hunters might be able to explain the mindset.

Again I'm not trying to bash or demonize anyone and I ask others to refrain from doing so also about the legal hunting practices of others. I just want to better understand.
 

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I think it is more a competitive thing. I'm a meat hunter but if grandpappy walked in front of me I would take it in a heartbeat! Tons of money spent on trying to get the trophy as well (talk about a flame war, start telling people most of that stuff is useless). I have no problem with it except for what you mentioned about the meat. I know several trophy hunters, but they all keep the meat.

I have not heard of people hunting for the rack and then wasting the meat. That would not sit well with me. Is this common or am I just out of touch?
 

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I think it is more a competitive thing. I'm a meat hunter but if grandpappy walked in front of me I would take it in a heartbeat! Tons of money spent on trying to get the trophy as well (talk about a flame war, start telling people most of that stuff is useless). I have no problem with it except for what you mentioned about the meat. I know several trophy hunters, but they all keep the meat.

I have not heard of people hunting for the rack and then wasting the meat. That would not sit well with me. Is this common or am I just out of touch?
Not very common by my experience, but I've seen it.
 

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I've always loved eating wild game and that is my primary motivation for hunting, but there have been times, usually after having filled the freezer with one tag, that I purchased another tag, then waited for a particular deer that I had patterned or a trophy and passed on anything else. That kept me hunting without taking more than I could eat in a reasonable amount of time. Now and then, it would pay off with a good trophy and then I would invite friends over to help me eat it or made gifts of sausage and so on.

Trying to hunt a specific animal and/or waiting for that trophy animal can be very challenging and I admire folks that will limit themselves, voluntarily, to taking these harder to hunt animals. It takes a lot of skill to do this, consistently. Yes, there are those that get obsessive to the point of bending and breaking the rules, but, by and large, most of the die hard trophy hunters I have known have been more ethical, not less ethical, than the average hunter.
 

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I think that most people keep the meat or donate it. I don't know of anybody that would let the meat just waste. Trophy hunting is more of a challenge for the hunter who may not necessarily need or want the meat so getting that harvest isn't a must have. It is a lot of fun to get an animal on camera and then try to target that particular one through patterning all season. I've never personally done that but I have friends that do and they really enjoy it and it keeps them coming back for more.

As for popping varmints I've never done that but the way I understand it livestock will step in those holes and break a leg or something like that then that animal needs to be put down. I'm not an expert on that though
 

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When I was in college, I got a summer job at a ranch, doing irrigation and driving tractors at haying time. The ranch owner was plagued with prairie dogs overrunning one of his pastures. When he threatened to use poison, a couple of us offered to thin the dogs out by shooting. He agreed that if we could keep them contained in that one pasture, he wouldn't use poison.

Dog towns are magnets for all kinds of wildlife - they're an important part of prairie ecology. That damn poison kills everything - hawks, owls, badgers, you name it. Keeping the towns thinned also reduces the incidence of disease. As far as I'm concerned, prairie dog shooters are doing the environment a favor. The alternative is no prairie dog towns.

Hunting coyotes can serve a similar purpose. I have no use for poisoning coyotes or, equally bad, throwing ethics to the wind by chasing and killing coyotes with ATVs and planes and such. On the other hand, I knew a champion coyote caller who did the same thing for ranchers that wanted to resort to poison. He worked as hard at his craft as any hunter I have known. He was certainly no slob hunter.

So, yes, I was raised on a you shoot it, you eat it code, but there are times when I do think that varmint hunting can be very ethical, sporting and good for the environment.
 

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When u see people trophy hunting on there own land and shoot a "trophy" they keep the meat but if your talking about payed hunts or people travelling for bigger animals most the time if its a payed hunt the hunter either keeps the meat or its donated to the needy i know this bc my uncle goes to montana every year and shoots monster whitetails a mulies but the meat is donated to the needy now if your talking about guys that buy moose tags for canada and shoot one and pack it out thats there choice if they keep or leave the meat i will always take the meat its how it is for me but i also dont like shooting inmuture animals also i want to keep the future around to.
 

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I am a meat hunter and if I happen to get lucky and get a nice buck then I may have it mounted. The primary consideration for me is the quality of the meat. I will shoot buck or doe and haven't bought any beef in a long time.
 

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Just cause one shoots a trophy, doesn't mean you can't eat it. For instance, my dad got a giant buck 2 years ago, and we all ate it and loved it. IHowever, there will come a time when I pay money to go on a trophy hunt, because I'm not going all the way to Africa for instance for a 40" Kudu. The nice thing about Africa is, you get to eat the backstraps off your animals, but then at the end of the hunt the PH usually takes you to a nearby village where you distribute the other 95% of the meat to needy people. It very rarely gets wasted.
 

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I'm a meat hunter only. That being said, I shoot animals that I don't eat, but keep the hide. The reason I shoot animals that I don't eat, is that they are animals who eat animals that I like to eat. Right now, our moose population is very low. Our bear and wolf populations are very high. Therefore I shoot bears (trying for a wolf... Hard to hunt) for their hide, and to help more moose live past yearling age. As far as ungulate trophies, I stay away, since I want the genetics to continue. Since our moose population is strained, we have very restrictive antler rules. They need to be at least 50" wide, or 4 brow tines. Moose around me tend to have more vertical antlers, so when an awesome bull has a really wide rack, I would tend to pass, since I want him making more babies with his genetics.
 

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fungun,

I hunt big game with a longbow. Trust me, it ain't easy. To me, any animal is a trophy.

FWIW, I can't stand hunting shows. My stomach turns watching the "experts".
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm a meat hunter only. That being said, I shoot animals that I don't eat, but keep the hide. The reason I shoot animals that I don't eat, is that they are animals who eat animals that I like to eat. Right now, our moose population is very low. Our bear and wolf populations are very high. Therefore I shoot bears (trying for a wolf... Hard to hunt) for their hide, and to help more moose live past yearling age. As far as ungulate trophies, I stay away, since I want the genetics to continue. Since our moose population is strained, we have very restrictive antler rules. They need to be at least 50" wide, or 4 brow tines. Moose around me tend to have more vertical antlers, so when an awesome bull has a really wide rack, I would tend to pass, since I want him making more babies with his genetics.
Curious what happens with the bear meat?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
fungun,

I hunt big game with a longbow. Trust me, it ain't easy. To me, any animal is a trophy.

FWIW, I can't stand hunting shows. My stomach turns watching the "experts".
I do archery as well when my joints allow, so I understand what you're saying.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
....but then at the end of the hunt the PH usually takes you to a nearby village where you distribute the other 95% of the meat to needy people. It very rarely gets wasted.
That works for me, I don't mind sharing.
 

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I am a meat hunter and if I happen to get lucky and get a nice buck then I may have it mounted. The primary consideration for me is the quality of the meat. I will shoot buck or doe and haven't bought any beef in a long time.
I'm of a very similar mindset, though I definitely still buy meat. Cali game populations and my time aren't what they used to be.
 

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When I was in college, I got a summer job at a ranch, doing irrigation and driving tractors at haying time. The ranch owner was plagued with prairie dogs overrunning one of his pastures. When he threatened to use poison, a couple of us offered to thin the dogs out by shooting. He agreed that if we could keep them contained in that one pasture, he wouldn't use poison.

Dog towns are magnets for all kinds of wildlife - they're an important part of prairie ecology. That damn poison kills everything - hawks, owls, badgers, you name it. Keeping the towns thinned also reduces the incidence of disease. As far as I'm concerned, prairie dog shooters are doing the environment a favor. The alternative is no prairie dog towns.

Hunting coyotes can serve a similar purpose. I have no use for poisoning coyotes or, equally bad, throwing ethics to the wind by chasing and killing coyotes with ATVs and planes and such. On the other hand, I knew a champion coyote caller who did the same thing for ranchers that wanted to resort to poison. He worked as hard at his craft as any hunter I have known. He was certainly no slob hunter.

So, yes, I was raised on a you shoot it, you eat it code, but there are times when I do think that varmint hunting can be very ethical, sporting and good for the environment.
I'm certainly not going to eat the gophers I shoot. And I'm shootin' them because of the damage they do. In the 70's when the coyote hide was the rage I hunted them for their pelts. But today I have a hard time shootin' a yote. They are so beautifull and I enjoy watching them go by the house. We have a male and female that lives in the woods next to us.
 

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Generally I'm a food hunter but will predator hunt at times also., especially when the chickens and dogs start disapearing.
Most times when drawing a Buck only tag I go after mature ones with sub-par "racks" as I prefer to keep the nicer ones in the gene pool. Or as in this case, it was late season, after the rut, and I had the oppourtunity to put a new hunter onto this one

that I had passed on several times previously. He looks rather happy , I think.
 

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Generally I'm a food hunter but will predator hunt at times also., especially when the chickens and dogs start disapearing.
Most times when drawing a Buck only tag I go after mature ones with sub-par "racks" as I prefer to keep the nicer ones in the gene pool. Or as in this case, it was late season, after the rut, and I had the oppourtunity to put a new hunter onto this one

that I had passed on several times previously. He looks rather happy , I think.
Nice buck. I'd be smiling, too.
 
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