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Well I got me some 240-gr Hornaday XTP's and am trying a new load with AA 5744 using 22.0 gr in my 2" .44 Mag... I hope to test these tomorrow.
 

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I like 22 to 24 grains of 2400 for a hunting load with a 240gr JHP. What 2" .44Mag do you have, JB...a Taurus?

I knew Taurus had them but discontinued the 2" in both the .44Mag and the .41Mag. Wish they would have kept the .44Mag. 2". Some of the dealers are wanting Taurus to re-introduce them. Hope they do.

Those that do not reload can use .44 Specials for "weenie loads."

Some of my .41Mag. customers use a Federal 250gr. Castcore that I order for them.
 

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Hi Ron,

I checked the Alliant site, and they list 18.7 as max for 2400. In what do you shoot your 44 mag load? Do you have any over pressure signs? I haven't loaded very much 44 mag, and the max I have loaded is 18.5 of 2400, so I don't know what an over pressure sign looks like in a 44 mag.

Glenn
 

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quote:Originally posted by glw

Hi Ron,

I checked the Alliant site, and they list 18.7 as max for 2400. In what do you shoot your 44 mag load? Do you have any over pressure signs? I haven't loaded very much 44 mag, and the max I have loaded is 18.5 of 2400, so I don't know what an over pressure sign looks like in a 44 mag.

Glenn
Glenn I havn't been to the Alliant site but in their loading pamphlet they show 21.5 gr. of 2400 as a max. I used 22grs for years and recently went down to 21.
JB, I have never used AA 5744 but I have used everything else that I could have found 20-30 years ago and have settled on 2400. Onanothernote, I have not found anything that really performs inacurately in the 44, at least at reasonable loading levels. You should be just fine.
Max Load
 

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Hi glw...Redhawk and Super Blackhawk, both stainless...I actually use 22 grains of 2400...My Spear book listed that...a lot of the gun writers used to recommend 22 to 24 grain of 2400 for years, but I found 22 grains to be very accurate. I haved not looked at the Alliant site.
 

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I checked a few other loading books and many suggest as max more than what is listed on Alliant's website. It sure does make it tough for a new reloader to figure where to stop! I'm not looking for the hottest load available, so I don't plan to push it to the limits.

Thanks for the replies.

Glenn
 

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glw, that's part of the fun in reloading. Treat these books as guides. Change any of the components and you need to start the load developement over. Remember, the most accurate load for any given component combo is often well below the 'hottest' max load.
 

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I agree jimbo...I use a reduced load of 29 grains of Reloader 7 in a .22-250 for prairie dogging with Hornady's 52 grain boat tail hollow points. The load is about 3490 instead of 3700. On a non-windy day, I can shoot a 3 shot group with my Ruger Varmint barrel, 100 yards, from a bench rest, and completely cover all three holes with a dime. It does not reach out for the 300 yard shots, but at 200 and in, it is deadly accurate. If you want fast, flat and hot, use a .220 Swift. Then you can burn out a barrel. I don't do that to my guns...ever.

Prairie dogs have "guards" that stand upright watching for threats. I stand in the box of a pickup when I shoot. I put an army blanket on the cab of the pickup so that I do not scratch the cab or the guns. I use two Ruger bull barrels on Harris bipods...one aimed slightly to the left and one to the right. I alternate shots. I keep the bolt open after each shot to cool the barrel. I start with the farthest out prairie dog and shoot him first. Then I work inword for the next and the next and the next. The dogs have no idea where the shots are coming from. If you shoot the closest one first, then they all duck down their holes for ten minutes or so. Then they come back up. I read this tactic of "starting from the rear" in a gun magazine once, probably Jim Carmichel, as I read him a lot, and it works for me. I would not have been smart enough to think of it.

Reduced loads can be very accurate. You certainly do not want to keyhole (tumble the bullet from too much velocity) a target.

Back to the .44Mag. The Spear book said 22 to 24 grains of 2400 with a 240 grain JHP. When I worked up to 22 grains and it was so accurate, I stopped there. I have not loaded beyond 22 grains, as I did not need to.
 

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quote:Originally posted by glw

Hi Ron,

I checked the Alliant site, and they list 18.7 as max for 2400. In what do you shoot your 44 mag load? Do you have any over pressure signs? I haven't loaded very much 44 mag, and the max I have loaded is 18.5 of 2400, so I don't know what an over pressure sign looks like in a 44 mag.

Glenn
Hi Glenn:D
Below, are for any cases. Not just for 44 mag,45 Colt or 30-06.
There's little things I wrote about.If I left something out,it was not intentional.I did include some things that are not 44 mag related,yet are case related.
Nearly all,if not all manuals, you buy has a section for inspection of cases,die adjustments,etc.
This is just like in a rifle case: signs abound.
Usually, the first sign is the cases sticks.Course, others can be included too.Every gun is an individual.What's OK for mine,in yours,
not.
Should sticking cases be found, then it's time to back off the powder.
This MIGHT be a grain or 2.Sticking still, back off another grain or two.Starting loads are a must.Then, work up.
There's many pluses and minuses in reloading.For that matters,in any thing we do.
Also, could be rough chambers to cause the cases to stick.An easy fix.
A "reader error";too fast of powder,with a heavier than usual bullet weight, can cause the pressure to skyrocket into the danger zone.
ALWAYS double check the powder to the bullet weight you'll be using.
Keep your manuals up-to-date.When checking for a particular bullet weight,read, and re-read the powder can.Just to make sure.
Hit the manual one more time.Trying to eliminate "operator error" as much as possible.Check your scales from time-to-time.
I've heard of mistakes being made.
Keep records of your loads.If good and accurate, then you can do a repeat performance.If a lousy,poor performance,write it down too.
Another thing,is having ammo out in the sun.This can raise pressures
big time.Could cause false high pressure signs.
Cold weather,well, haven't experienced that....yet.
Primer flattening,well, nearly all fired primers are flattened,even at safe pressures.As it is being,thrust rearward ie:recoil,the case is comming backward,due to the pressures being in a 360 Deg,not just to the bullet,being forced out of the case/chamber into the barrel.
But, when the primer flows,looking like a larger primer than usual,time to back off the powder.Manuals has this also.
We're dealing with tons of pressure for a few scant milliseconds.
Then, there's brass flow.Another sign of over pressure.Gross OVER pressure.Very bad sign.In a revolver,you might be lucky to get those cases out.
Case separation do happen.It's when the case has been stretched beyond it's useful limit/life. Nothing lasts forever.
One thing I made,from a reloading manual: A straightened paper clip,a heavy duty one,or heavy guage steel wire,sharpened at one end.Then bent almost 90 Deg,about 3/16",from the end, will be an aid to find those cases.1/16" stainless filler rod can be used
It's used by placing the sharp,bend wire into the case.Drag it lightly.A normal case,you'll feel a smooth interior.A streched case,
will feel smooth, then like a reverse speed bump,you'll feel it.Time to crush that case, and dispose of it.
Can be used for rifle or pistol cases.
Sometimes, a bright ring will show.Another case separation indicator.
Another "sometimes" is no indicator.When checking with the tool, the case can feel normal.When fired, it comes apart.when this happens, a broken case extractor is required.Or the possibility of a gunsmith, to remove the rest of the case in the chamber.
I've had case splits (45 Colt), and case separation (30-06).
The Rugers are built to take the pressure.A Freedom Arms,it ain't.
Each caliber has it's limits.
There has been talk on sixgunner forums about "Weak 45 Colt Cases".
FYI: sixgunner has been off line for some time.Due to ?????
Was an article in "Guns& Ammo" some months back.
I wrote, that the 45 Colt cases are not weak.Uncle Elmer had a balloon case come apart,thus "Weak 45 Cases...".You'd be lucky-or unlucky to find balloon head cases anymore.I have 1.It's been separated,and kept a a reminder of the "good old days".
With some loads I've made, those cases sure ain't weak !
What I fired these loads in, was my F.A. Model 83 454 Casull.Was firing 250gr at over 1400+ FPS.I sure don't want to find out if the Ruger can take it.Will either fire then from the F.A.,or strip them down.
Well, it's actually the chamber, that contains the live ammo.
And every chamber has a limit.This is where we really have to watch it.
I've shot some very HOT loads in my Ruger RedHawk.I mean, these were in the no-doubt dangerous zone.Was up there at or very near what the 454 Casull operates at.Chronographed them.Those 320gr JDJ's were going OVER 1500 FPS.Cases stuck like you would not believe !
In my manual, I wrote "DANGEROUS DO NOT LOAD".My loads were the 44 mag.The handgun was intact.Had it until some druggie stole it.Now in the hands of gangs.And so is the ammo,loaded to much safer levels.
Still,this ammo is capable of doing a lot of damage.
The replacement RedHawk,isn't like the first one.Still accurate.So,I can't complain.Oh, both RedHawks are stainless.
Case inspection is another "must do".
Anyway Glenn, I hope this helps.
 

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quote:Originally posted by jimbo1096

Interesting how a topic gets revived after a couple of months - think I heard someone else say that once. Anyway, I use this as a reference and find the info helpful---You might too.
http://www.realguns.com/loads/44mag.htm
Hi jimbo :D
Some of those loads in the 240gr HP's, are a tad faster than I load.[:0]
About 1gr off the book.About 1687 FPS with a 7.5" barrel.
No high pressure signs.
Will need to chronograph, and see what the target looks like.
Shot them out of my Winchester lever.Easy extractions from both.
Those 320gr JDJ's I cast,is another story.
One batch has a high silver content.Thought the silver solder would contribute to a more consistant weight.Did make for some harder bullets.
Weights ran from around 325,up to 329gr (From memory).
Never have recovered a single bullet.Rocks were hit so hard,it left a splat.
From this RedHawk,will have to see what happens at the range.
You have a good day !
 

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I have used SR4759 in the .44 Mag before. It worked OK, but not great.
My choice is AA #9.
 

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I've used the same .44 Mag. load for hunting, for 20 odd years now, in my short barreled Rugers. I use a Hornady 200 Gr. (XTP now), backed up with 28 Gr's. of W.W.-296, & a W.W. Lge. pistol primer. It's "not" a plinking load, & I would "not" attempt to use it in anything but my Rugers. In the 10" SBH I use a 225Gr. 3/4 jacketed SWCHP profile Speer, backed by a respectable charge of Blue Dot, & a W.W. Lge. pistol primer. For playful loads I shoot .44 Spl. loads,mostly consisting of Unique, & lead.
 
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