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I am thinking about making the leap into handgun hunting for deer and hogs. Which gun wold you consider the best the Super Blackhawk Hunter or the Super Redhawk? I will be putting a 2X Leupold scope on it. 44 magnum of course
 

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I see it as a personal preference. Can't see that one has an advantage over the other. I've owned and hunted with both the SRH and SBH. For me, the SRH was a bit more comfortable to shoot, but I'm sure some folks would say the same thing for the SBH.
 

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Okay, I realize that my post wasn't exactly overflowing with content, but my hunting with those guns took place back in the 70s and 80s when I was determined to proove I could keep up with the guys when it came to shooting the big stuff and, back then, the 44 mag was THE big stuff.

My Super Blackhawk was not a Hunter, because they did not have the Hunter in the 70s. It was a 7 1/2" Super Blackhawk without a scope, but I took my first deer, ever with it, so Blackhawks will always have a special place in my heart.

The Super Redhawk 7 1/2" was scoped with a Leupold 2x. Wasn't too crazy about the looks of the SRH, but the SRH was my mentor's favorite, so I tried it. Believe me, I forgot all about the looks when I started to shoot it. With almost any factory ammo, it would group 5 shots under 2" at 50 yards. However, the weight of the gun with scope was at the absolute max for what I could hold and shoot offhand. Don't think I could handle it, these days. Of course, guys do have more wrist and arm strength so take that for what it's worth.

It also took me a good long while to build up to where I could manage the recoil of the 44, but, again, might be a different story for guys. I will say that the grips and weight of the SRH made shooting the 44 more manageable for me.

Either the SBH Hunter or the SRH are big, heavy guns, so if you are carrying a lot, that might be a factor for you. Not a big deal if shooting from a blind or a bench, but those are tanks. if I decide to take a deer these days, it will be with my scoped GP-100 4" and I'll just get as close as needed to get the job done.
 

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I hunt alot with the SBH, someday i would like to own a Hunter when i can afford to have more than one handgun for SD/DH/hunting/bears/targets and plinking.
I don't see alot of point in a DA hunting gun, but the SRH can take some slightly hotter loads than the SBH, but neither is a slouch and can take pretty much any factory or reloaded round you can throw at them. I personally would buy a SBHH in .41, .45 or .44 in that order, then take the money you saved over the SRH and buy a good reddot, or more ammo/components if you reload.
This is really not that big of an issue because either of them will be plenty accurate for any job, and hunt well for you.
Good luck, and watch out, handgun hunting is addictive!
 

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I'm not really into revolvers, but I did used to carry one as my duty weapon. Isn't the only different between the Blackhawk and the Redhawk the action, with the Blackhawk being a single action?

Personally, since you can shoot most any DA in SA mode, I don't know why anyone would opt for the SA only. Maybe someone can enlighten me. :eek:
 

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Personally, since you can shoot most any DA in SA mode, I don't know why anyone would opt for the SA only. Maybe someone can enlighten me. :eek:
I can try...

First, because in hunting the major factor is accurate shooting, the single action works just fine; there simply isn't a need for DA in hunting.

Second, the SA revolver is safer if you are in a scenario where you are possibly running or moving around with the revolver in hand. It's near impossible for an accidental discharge with a SA. This is especially true on horseback or in a 4 wheeler.

Lastly, their designs are slightly simpler and more rugged.
 

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I can try...

First, because in hunting the major factor is accurate shooting, the single action works just fine; there simply isn't a need for DA in hunting.

Second, the SA revolver is safer if you are in a scenario where you are possibly running or moving around with the revolver in hand. It's near impossible for an accidental discharge with a SA. This is especially true on horseback or in a 4 wheeler.

Lastly, their designs are slightly simpler and more rugged.
True, true and true!

Also, as i pointed out, less moving parts and less machining means cheaper costs, which can be a factor for alot of us.
 

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Strictly a matter of preference between Redhawk, Super Redhawk, and Super Blackhawk. Each handles perfectly well SAAMI pressure ammunition. Each incorporates Ruger transfer bar lockwork.

For hunting, longer barrels offer advantage of more velocity and less recoil. And ability to scope without optic extending to or beyond muzzle----a no-no.
For stand hunting, the scope extends shooting light a small amount. In tracking, you are all done when light fades.

One cannot easily exaggerate the importance of trying the various grip types, as this becomes the deal maker on comfort under recoil and his or her ability to place the shot. This ability to place the shot is the only ground for marksmanship, and marksmanship is the only ground for confidence. Therefore, the fit of the grip under recoil----not in the gun store----determines whether the gun enjoys life in your hand and you enjoy meat on the table.
David Bradshaw
 

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My very first handgun was a SBH Bisley with a 71/2 barrel. Its shoots well and accurate. I've used it to hunt anything from snow shoe hares to white tails and black tails. It has a 4x scope on it now and with good 44mag ammo its deadly to 100 plus yards. The bisley frame makes for more accurate shooting IMO. The grip angle just lets me hold it steadier longer. But its an individual thing, try it out see how it feels in your hand.
 

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A Bisley Hunter would be my choice because it is more useable with a scope, fewer moving parts, and a double action has no advantage for well placed shots.
 

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My Blackhawk isn't "super" but, when shooting, I have never missed the ability to shoot DA. It has that cowboy feel only SA revolvers can give!
 

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My hunting pistol of choice here in Maine is my 44 mag bisley hunter.
I load a Med. hard 240 grain K lead bullet that I cast from a Lyman 429421 mold.
I have been using long shot powder, 10 grains for about 1100 FPS Deer don't like it one bit.
Is it accurate ? clay birds at 130 yards don't like it either.
My only complaint is---------I only have one.
I will say they are a little heavy with the tube being 7.5" --
it just takes a little getting use to and a lot of practice. But hey the ammo is cheep.
700 primers $21.00 powder 700 rounds $20.00 lead bullets = just my time, so for a little over $40.00 I can load 700 rounds. I say 700 cause that's how many rounds I get from a pound of powder.
If I am concerned about black bare, I just load a 270 or 300 grain bullet with a nice big meplat, good penetration on Moose also with H110 powder.
If I were the OP I wouldn't be concerned with the weight of the pistol. Get a little shorter barrel and shoot at the distance you are confident at.
A 240/250 lead or Jacketed bullet cruising at 1000 0r 1,100 FPS is plenty medicine for any hog or deer, and loaded with some of the slower burning powders is not that hard on the wrist or hand, I kinda favor the bisley grip. I also found with the fiber optic sights
I don't need a scope or the extra weight it may add. Target acquisition is very fast and the sites light up like little red and green bulbs. ( no they don't hurt your eyes )
I am not a big guy, 155 pounds 5'8" and not that young, I can shoot 150 rounds of my Deer load without a problem and then go shoot 200 rounds of my 45 in the 1911
Use what you are comfortable and confident with, don't forget a simple set of shooting sticks that will work for a pistol is a big help. Even a walking stick if you learn how to use it. Well as usual I got a little mouthy. I just don't like folks thinking they can't do something.

gray wolf
 

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True, true and true!

Also, as i pointed out, less moving parts and less machining means cheaper costs, which can be a factor for alot of us.
Cowboy my old mate you omitted to point out one very important factor......the best reason to use a Blackhawk is that they are are just so darn cool!!!:cool:;)
 

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Firearm season starts in IN in 2 weeks. I'll be using a RH, 7 1/2 with 2X Leupold for the first time. I have Pach grips and I'll be using Corbon ammo. I feel comfortable placing a kill shot out to 75 yards. Plenty of deer in the area.
 

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It really comes down to personal preference...but I would probably go with the SRH...I, personally, find the grip more comfortable than a SA gun!
 

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I've owned several SBH 44 mags and several SRH 44 mags, I prefer the SRH or or the Double action over the single action mainly because they are easier to load and unload.
Other then that it is a toss up, both shoot well, my present hunting handgun is a 9.5" SRH in the 44 mag. As stated by others it is just personal preference
 

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I have had my share of Blackhawks that I have hunted with. I was using them before the Hunter model came out with scopes. The Hunter just made it easier to mount a scope to one I would have preferred they came out with a Target Grey version over the stainless. I have since traded the Hunter in for a TC G2 which is a cannon in its own right. The 300 grain loads from Hornady worked well for factory ammo the Buffalo's were more then a handful to shoot. To really get the most out of it you need to reload plus it gets you shooting a lot more which is always a good thing.

I like the feel of the Blackhawk in the hand over the Redhawk, the Blackhawk rolls back in your hand when you shoot the Redhawk rolls your whole arm back.

The downside to hunting with a handgun is they are LOUD
 

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A little more on the Bisley SBH, chambered for the 44 Magnum cartridge, the Super Blackhawk was the choice of hunters and shooters who needed a reliable, strong, and durable 44 Magnum revolver. When the Ruger Bisley was added to the line in 1985, it accommodated shooters who needed a grip frame to better handle heavy recoil, having a more comfortable grip.The Blackhawk and Super grip frames deliver pain quickly when shooting heavy loads, and most find that the Bisley grip frame is more comfortable and more controllable to shoot, especially when shooting bullets at magnum speeds which weigh in the 300 grain class. The Ruger single action is the chassis for most custom heavy-caliber sixguns built today, and top-tier builders, such as Hamilton Bowen, insist upon using the Bisley grip frame on the 475 and 500 caliber revolvers. Now I'm paraphrasing gun writer Jeff Quinn on the Bisley frame but he nailed it in my view. If your going to shoot heavy loads the Bisley grip frame just shoots better. As for double action vs single.., well its a hunting gun single action triggers breaks lighter and quicker. Best I can tell you is try a few out with a heavy load and see what you like. Trying it yourself is the best advice anyone can give.
 
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