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Know your firearm and your ammo. If in doubt, don't do it. A coworker of mine has permanent speckled gunpowder tattoos all over his face from shooting a antique shotgun with new hot field loads. It exploded on him. Safety glasses saved his eyes
Be aware of surplus ammo too. Make sure its not proof rounds.
I appreciate this video and wish him all the best and a most speedy recovery.
 

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A tension pneumothorax decompression with a K-Bar... That's some really quick thinking. I wouldn't have even thought of trying that with anything other than a syringe like they taught us in our Combat Life Saver class.
Hands on Field Training always trumps class room training.
 

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Hands on Field Training always trumps class room training.
I think attempting to use a K-Bar to decompress a tension pneumothorax goes a little beyond the subject of classroom versus field training. The Army's Combat Life Saver course uses very realistic medical training dummies, so it's about as hands-on as you can get without using real people or live pigs.

The more appropriate way to frame it is doctrinally accepted versus improvised out of the height of necessity. Being able to improvise like that comes from pure experience garnered through trial and error. When the equipment isn't available to use the doctrinally accepted method, only experience provides the insight needed to use a seemingly inappropriate tool for the job.
 

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I think attempting to use a K-Bar to decompress a tension pneumothorax goes a little beyond the subject of classroom versus field training. The Army's Combat Life Saver course uses very realistic medical training dummies, so it's about as hands-on as you can get without using real people or live pigs.

The more appropriate way to frame it is doctrinally accepted versus improvised out of the height of necessity. Being able to improvise like that comes from pure experience garnered through trial and error. When the equipment isn't available to use the doctrinally accepted method, only experience provides the insight needed to use a seemingly inappropriate tool for the job.
The "hands-on" experience I'm talking about came/comes from being in actual VERY realistic combat, with ACTUAL people. Combat Engineer 70-73.
 

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The "hands-on" experience I'm talking about came/comes from being in actual VERY realistic combat, with ACTUAL people. Combat Engineer 70-73.
"Realistic" combat or "real" combat? If it's "realistic" combat, then it's training. If it's "real" combat, then it's experience, just as I said earlier.
 

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Yes the above situation reminds me of why their are different loads data for the older single action army revolvers and the newer ruger revolvers, you put the high pressure rounds in the old revolver, and your gonna get a kaboom.

I tell people when they ask about the 50 that it requires alot of discipline, and increased safety measures. What i mean is you really have to worry about the distance the round can travel, the energy the round has, and the immense pressure the 50bmg produces. Think about it 750 grain bullet, between 214 and 240 grains of gunpowder, and a primer 4 to 5 times the size of a large rifle primer. You have to be aware of ricochets as a famous video on you tube shows the hearing protection knocked off a guy shooting steel to close. Lucky he didn't loose his head. 12,000 ft lbs of muzzle energy. You have to be sure you have a great back stop, and capable of defeating the round. When i bought mine, a barrett, i did so because i wanted the best if i was gonna ignite a 50bmg so close to my face.

Somebody referenced a proofing round, i was not aware they were sold commercially due to the risks they could have. I would figure they would be very hard to acquire although surplus is possible. Another reason i only shoot my reloads and not others.

Just a few thoughts.
 

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It was an interesting video and I am glad he is ok. For those of you unfamiliar with the SLAP round that caused the catastrophic failure, here is a little write-up. What I find interesting is that it’s not like this ammo was 100 years old, it was developed in the last 30-40 years. What is also interesting is reading about why the .308 version was abandoned due to catastrophic failures of the sabot and the penetrator coming out the side of the barrel.

 

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So with the listed data as being lighter and faster, its safe to say the powder charge was increased which is typical in most reloading manuals, heavier less charge, lighter bullet more charge. i wonder if that is a possible clue, but the round going out the side of the barrel, is it possible the sabot twisted in the barrel causing an obstruction and overpressure failure. Interesting for sure.

But its a 50 bmg, how much more penetration do you need? Trade up to an anzio 20mm. ;)
 

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So with the listed data as being lighter and faster, its safe to say the powder charge was increased which is typical in most reloading manuals, heavier less charge, lighter bullet more charge. i wonder if that is a possible clue, but the round going out the side of the barrel, is it possible the sabot twisted in the barrel causing an obstruction and overpressure failure. Interesting for sure.

But its a 50 bmg, how much more penetration do you need? Trade up to an anzio 20mm. ;)
It’s hard to know what happened and we will never know. There is also the theory, at least in my mind, of transportation of the SLAP rounds. I have heard the old wives tale where ammo that has ridden around in a car for a couple year then shot blows up a gun. The theory being the bumps and vibrations break up the powder kernels increasing surface area and increasing the burn rate.

But also, to your point, a round that loaded hotter and the sabot allows the penetrater to get sideway or misaligned would create a pressure spike for sure.
 

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"Realistic" combat or "real" combat? If it's "realistic" combat, then it's training. If it's "real" combat, then it's experience, just as I said earlier.
REAL COMBAT EXPERIENCE !!!
 

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So all that back pressure was held by a screw-on cap on the Serbu? Maybe a locking bolt on another type of gun would have also failed, but being encapsulated in a receiver would probably have been a safer design with a better outcome.
 

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After watching the "explosion" at roughly the 4 min mark ( yes i fast forwarded per the guy who sent it to me) i went back and watched it in it's entirety. I was amazed at the screw on end piece and how the rear of the gun locked in place. Still not sure if this is a one and done custom or a commercially produced firearm. I think he says ( hard to fully catch it) Barrett ... does anyone know this to be true?
It was this: RN-50
 

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Mark Serbu, who designed and manufactures the RN-50, stated that it would take between 80 - 85k psi to strip the threads of the cap the way it did! Ouch! Scott, the guy from Kentucky Ballistics, says, in another video, the rounds he fired were NOT milsurp but may have been loaded by the original manufacturer or by some other unknown person... he simply did not know where the rounds originated. He also said he should have been more discerning as the round previously fired had "more than usual" recoil and muzzle flash. Still, at $100 per round, I doubt that any of us willing to shoot the thing in the first place would have been likely to stop.
Yes, Scott is a very fortunate man and it's a good thing his father was there to help him (I will not say he was lucky... had he been lucky, his rifle would not have blown up!). This should serve as fair warning to anyone that wants to run with the big dogs and play around with ammo of unknown origins! Scary stuff indeed!
Cheers,
crkckr
 

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I have been watching this since it was first reported. I do some forensic engineering for my employer and study why things fail. The You Tube videos that have followed the original Kentucky Ballistics video have been quite humorous. There have been several You Tubers step up to show their ignorance while trying to get views.

The best video(s) out on this (there are 2 so far) are by an Italian engineer on his channel Backyard Ballistics. He has some great content on what causes these explosions and what guns detonated by over-loads, stuck bullets and bore obstructions look like after failure.

I would not want to be the designer/seller of these guns right now. There are several thousand in shooters hands as we speak. The maker wants the gun back to study why it failed. Personally, a third party evaluation is in order.

I have my own opinion of why this thing failed. It follows the same idea Backyard Ballistics has; that pressure from a ruptured case got between the failed case head and the under-side of the threaded cap. The cap has a large surface area for the pressure to act on. A simple vent in the cap, like just about every bolt action gun made uses, would minimize the potential damage from this type failure.
 

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I have been watching this since it was first reported. I do some forensic engineering for my employer and study why things fail. The You Tube videos that have followed the original Kentucky Ballistics video have been quite humorous. There have been several You Tubers step up to show their ignorance while trying to get views.

The best video(s) out on this (there are 2 so far) are by an Italian engineer on his channel Backyard Ballistics. He has some great content on what causes these explosions and what guns detonated by over-loads, stuck bullets and bore obstructions look like after failure.

I would not want to be the designer/seller of these guns right now. There are several thousand in shooters hands as we speak. The maker wants the gun back to study why it failed. Personally, a third party evaluation is in order.

I have my own opinion of why this thing failed. It follows the same idea Backyard Ballistics has; that pressure from a ruptured case got between the failed case head and the under-side of the threaded cap. The cap has a large surface area for the pressure to act on. A simple vent in the cap, like just about every bolt action gun made uses, would minimize the potential damage from this type failure.
I saw the same Backyard Ballistics video and thought it the most credible, as well. I am no engineer but had enough calculus-based physics beaten into my head, back in the day, to appreciate the force vectors he described.
 
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