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Discussion Starter #1
Well, a week from now (Nov 4th), will attend my CCW class for Ohio. A 1 day class using NRA style.

Any tips or helpful hints as to what to prepare for? Thanks!
 

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No real advice, just enjoy the class. Ask questions if something is not clear to you. It will get some good discussion going. And trust me if something is not clear to you someone else is thinking the same thing.
 

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ditto what he said, never been to one as it is not required in PA. Ask questions if you have them, don't be shy as no such thing as a stupid question. Otherwise, enjoy the class and the gained knowledge that comes with it.

No real advice, just enjoy the class. Ask questions if something is not clear to you. It will get some good discussion going. And trust me if something is not clear to you someone else is thinking the same thing.
 

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Hope you don't get one of the rambo type classes I've heard about. The participants discuss "blowing people away" for most of the class time, then go out for range time and just casually shoot until time is up. Zero benefit to anyone who actually wanted to learn something.

It's rare, but these classes do skate by somehow.
 

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My Ohio class was 10 hours of instruction spread over 2 days. We were instructed in firearm terminology, types, safe useage, Situational awareness, Law, and general CCW discussion. Then live fire qualifying at 3, 7 and 10 yards, strong, and weak hand shooting, and shooting from waist level. A total of 100 rounds were fired. I enjoyed myself, and being a gun owner for over 30 years now, and being very familiar with guns in general, the instruction was very well done.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Went to meet to instructor prior to enrolling, seems level-headed and thorough. I liked the place and the price, and the fact it was all in one day, as I only have one day off a week.

On a side note:
Told me I was 'tea-cupping' in my grip and he'd correct it with the 'Isoseles' style. Anyone heard of this grip style?

Back on point, thanks for the replies!
 

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jjh ... In the big picture (based on Ohio law) you will have 10 hours of classroom work and 2 hours of range time. The exact curriculum during the classroom and the exact live fire process will vary from instructor to instructor. The Ohio law states the following with regard to the general training requirements:
Minimum Educational Requirements

The Attorney General does not endorse any particular form of training or instructor. However, a list of instructors certified by the Ohio Peace Officer Training Commission (OPOTC) who wish to teach classes to the general public is available on the Attorney General’s website at www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov. County sheriffs also may have a list of certified instructors who have provided contact information to the sheriff. The law sets out minimum educational requirements that are a component of the various forms of competency certification as set forth on page 2. The total time required for training is 12 hours: 10 hours of instruction and another two hours of experience shooting a handgun. The law requires at least 10 hours of certified training in the following matters:
• The ability to name, explain, and demonstrate the rules for safe handling of a handgun and proper storage practices for handguns and ammunition;
• The ability to demonstrate and explain how to handle ammunition in a safe manner;
• The ability to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to shoot a handgun in a safe manner;
• Gun-handling training.

Additionally, you must have two hours of practical training, including range time and live-fire experience. The applicant also must complete an examination that tests his competency. The test must include a written section on the ability to name and explain the rules for the safe handling of a handgun and proper storage practices for handguns and ammunition. Additionally, the exam must include a physical demonstration of competency on handgun usage and rules for safe handling and storage of a handgun. It also must require a physical demonstration of the attitude necessary to shoot a handgun in a safe manner. As part of the training, applicants also must receive and certify that they have reviewed a copy of this publication. As an advisory to consumers, the Attorney General recommends anyone contemplating private handgun training take the following minimum steps before paying for any form of training:
• Verify the person teaching the class is qualified to teach.
• Confirm the instructor knows the requirements of the law.
• Be certain the instructor will provide you with this publication.
• Verify whether a refund or additional training may be available if a county sheriff determines, when you apply for a license, that the course did not meet the law’s requirements.
Additionally, I would recommend that your review the information at the following link Ohio CCW Information Center

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
 

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No real advice, just enjoy the class. Ask questions if something is not clear to you. It will get some good discussion going. And trust me if something is not clear to you someone else is thinking the same thing.
+++1 Be thinking of questions you want covered, now, before you get to class and then don't be shy about asking them when you get there.
 

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Well, a week from now (Nov 4th), will attend my CCW class for Ohio. A 1 day class using NRA style.

Any tips or helpful hints as to what to prepare for? Thanks!
Just relax & be open-minded. You can learn a lot.
Just know what you have to bring, i.e. eye & ear protection or do they provide it? Lunch or do you have time to go out? Gun & ammo or is everything provided?
I thought Missouri was very good in that you have to shoot a revolver & semi-auto. 50 rounds practice & 20 to qualify on each. My wife had never shot a revolver & did very well. They used all Rugers where we went.(SP101 & MKIII)
It's a fun day, enjoy it!
 

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Well, a week from now (Nov 4th), will attend my CCW class for Ohio. A 1 day class using NRA style.

Any tips or helpful hints as to what to prepare for? Thanks!
Can't say for all instructors, but I was very happy with the class my wife and I took together (Powers Defensive Tactics - Wintersville, Ohio). It reminded my very much of the MSF Motorcycle course I took years ago. The class is designed to teach absolute novices the basics they need to know in order to obtain their CCW (CHL now) in Ohio. They cover safe hand gun handling, technique, tactics, basic balistics, as well as legal and moral considerations. Although geared towards novices, the instructors we extremely knowledgable and were more than happy to discuss advanced topics with the more experienced students.

The range excercises were very well organized and I never felt unsafe or under pressure.

My advice: Relax and go in with an open mind. Even if you've been shooting for years, there's a real good chance you'll learn something if you pay attention. I've been shooting for a long time, but never carried and my wife had only put about 100 rounds through a hand gun when we took the class. I'd say we probably both gained the same volumn of knowledge.
 

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I'll only say this concerning what happened when I got my first license, it's still burned in my memory. Listen VERY CAREFULLY to the instructor when doing your range proficiency. Don't know about other states, but the instructor calls out each shot and used a whistle to signal when to commence shooting. On the very first shot, the instruction was at the signal to shot a single round at a 5 yard target within two seconds. When he signaled, I swear, half the class discharged all 5 rounds they had loaded in their magazines. I don't have to tell you the instructor was a raging bull for about 5 minutes after that. Instructor was a 40 year veteran (ret) of the Houston PD.

Other than that, enjoy your time, and ask lots of questions.
 

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Don't understand why these classes need to be so complicated but it's apparent that some states feel that they should determine how much of a marksman you are in order to exercise your constitutional rights. The wife and I took our clubs' 4 hour indoctrination and range safety class and also a 4 hour basic handgun class before we took the Oregon CHL course, but that was our choice, not a state requirement.

My advice would be to study the laws in your state beforehand and know your responsibilities, liability, and restrictions on carry. IMHO, a good instructor should also give out the contact information for a good defense lawyer in case you should ever need to exercise your right to defend yourself with a firearm.
 

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Great advice from all. I am an instructor and own a school in TN, a state where a course is required. Enjoy the course. It should be fun as well as informative. Even a person with a lot of knowledge going in should leave with more knowledge. Usually the qualification courses are pretty general as far as the range time and you may want to take other classes (NRA or other advanced training).

Do check out your state Dept of Safety Web Site to stay on top of legal issues and do not be afraid to check out other sources if what the instructor says does not work for you.

You want to understand situational awareness so that you can avoid being forced to defend yourself. Bottom line be safe, aware, learn and have fun.
 

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Went to meet to instructor prior to enrolling, seems level-headed and thorough. I liked the place and the price, and the fact it was all in one day, as I only have one day off a week.

On a side note:
Told me I was 'tea-cupping' in my grip and he'd correct it with the 'Isoseles' style. Anyone heard of this grip style?

Back on point, thanks for the replies!
Isosoles refers to stance. Proper grip as taught by modern shooting schools can be found here. Pistol Shooting: The Ultimate Grip, Stance & Presentation. - YouTube
This helps control recoil and faster follow up shots with semi auto. It is slightly modified for wheel guns to keep from blowing off your thumb ;)
 

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Be sure to know what your training class is getting you into. In my CA area, the reason it's easier to get a CCW is that someone (thank him very much), sued the sheriff for denying a CCW to him. The courts got on his butt and now he's pretty much a "shall issue" sheriff. Take and pass the class and you're in.

Trouble with the classes is that they are the one's conducting the certifications for the range. One class has you shoot any way you are comfortable 15 rounds at seven yards and 15 rounds at fifteen yards. The other class goes 12 rounds each at 3, 7, and 15 yards. Now the latter sounds like an easier way to go, but he also has you shooting from the hip. I'm not too sure why, but I'd rather be using the sights with a two handed hold and not one handed hip shooting. Smithy.
 

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The reason you shoot from the hip is that you may not have time to get in the perfect stance, gun leveled at attacker, and sights in alignment. Bringing the gun out of the holster, or pocket and an immediate shot might be all the time you have. Its very possible you might be in a contact struggle and need that shot.
 

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Texas qualification is easy. 20 rounds at 3yards, 20 rounds at 7 yards and 10 rounds at 15 yards. All shots fired using a 2 hand grip in whatever stance is comfortable. Need a min of 175/250 score to qualify. All that is reported to state is pass/fail.
 

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I had a NRA instructor, very good and willing to answer all questions. Most important thing 1st and formost is listen to everything he or she says. Listening will in all likely hood answer your question or most of them. Our qualification was 30 rounds in center mass before passing, i passed 1st time. Out of 25 other people only 12 passed the course. So get used to firing your weapon, the reason the people in my class failed was failing to qualify.
 

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The reason you shoot from the hip is that you may not have time to get in the perfect stance, gun leveled at attacker, and sights in alignment. Bringing the gun out of the holster, or pocket and an immediate shot might be all the time you have. Its very possible you might be in a contact struggle and need that shot.
Quite true indeed, but police have standardized shooting requirements as does the NRC and other agencies (I know since I use to have to pass those NRC qualifications). These involved shooting out to 50 yards, offhand shooting, shooting in a gas mask, shooting at dark, and shooting behind barricades. The thing is, all the tests were the same.

Now we go to shooting for a CA CCW and it seems like the issuance of the same in that it's up to the individual sheriff or his/her designated training facility. In other words, not the same at all. If shooting from the hip is so important, then all of the training courses should have shooting from the hip. Just like my CA motorcycle license. At the time I took my test all I had was a Honda Express (49cc scooter) and an automatic. Yet I received the very same license that I'd ever need to drive a huge monstrous Harley. Sometimes things just don't make much sense. Smithy.
 

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