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Just picked this up this am. It's a NIB Bisley 45 Colt.

I'm curious what you would do to it or would you just shoot it as is?

 

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Shoot it as is for a while. First, make sure its all as it should be before making any changes. THEN, I would check the throats and ream as necessary (most likely necessary). Then go back and shoot it a bunch again. After that, then maybe some new grips, but other than that, its good. Some will say trigger or springs, but that should be evaluated after you have shot it enough to wear it in a bit and can evaluate how you like it as it is.
 

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Shoot it as is for a while. First, make sure its all as it should be before making any changes. THEN, I would check the throats and ream as necessary (most likely necessary). Then go back and shoot it a bunch again. After that, then maybe some new grips, but other than that, its good. Some will say trigger or springs, but that should be evaluated after you have shot it enough to wear it in a bit and can evaluate how you like it as it is.
^^^Good advice here. Nothing I can add.
 

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I don’t understand the compulsion to immediately start modifying a new firearm without even shooting it first ...
 

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All depends on your personal shooting desire and ability. Some will be satisfied with stock triggers and just decent groups. Others want to make the experience the best it can be. That's up to you.

As for me, My advice would be to shoot it first. Make sure it functions and there isn't something wrong with it where you might have send back to factory. Then as above I'd test the throats for size. Ream if necessary. Then test/set the forcing cone for 11 degrees. Shoot it some more checking for leading and accuracy. At this point I'd have dropped one leg off the trigger spring to make lighter pull. Finally if I 'really' like the gun, I have it tuned to my specs. The stock trigger will 'never' loose it's creep no matter how smooth, nor be exactly where you want it for pull. At least all of mine never have. So off to the gunsmith it will go. I used to put up with the stock trigger action, but after having one properly tuned, I wouldn't have it any other way now. Custom grips may be in the cards if you don't care for the grip panel fit, look, or style (on most Ruger SAs, the fit is lousy).

That said, the last few .45 Colt Ruger revolvers I bought I didn't follow my own advise ... that is shoot them first. I just checked and reamed and set forcing cones. Then shot them later. :rolleyes: Worked out for me.
 

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I'll be the odd man out, the first thing I do to a New Model Ruger single-action revolver is add a lighter weight trigger spring, like the Wolff 30 oz spring.:)
Why?
 

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Shoot it as is for a while. First, make sure its all as it should be before making any changes. THEN, I would check the throats and ream as necessary (most likely necessary). Then go back and shoot it a bunch again. After that, then maybe some new grips, but other than that, its good. Some will say trigger or springs, but that should be evaluated after you have shot it enough to wear it in a bit and can evaluate how you like it as it is.
I agree.
 

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Depends on how it feels in the Palm of my hand. I probably would not buy it if it didn't feel right from the beginning. That being said the local gun shop has a great feeling SA Blackhawk used.That is so sharp looking. I'm tempted to put a deposit on it then start the New Jersey state police paper chase.
 

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It gives a lighter trigger pull and smooths it out if there is any creep. Sorry, I originally gave kind of a flip answer. The first thing I would do is to shoot the revolver stock as it came new and make sure function is all good, then the lighter trigger spring would be the second thing I would do.
 

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It gives a lighter trigger pull and smooths it out if there is any creep. Sorry, I originally gave kind of a flip answer. The first thing I would do is to shoot the revolver stock as it came new and make sure function is all good, then the lighter trigger spring would be the second thing I would do.
Ok, that makes more sense. Appreciate the answer.
 

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I always shot 'em "as is" first. Then I will drop one of the trigger spring legs and see how that works. Grips and Wolff springs may come next and so on.

But one of my best shooting buds tricks his new ones out before a bullet goes through it.

So I say "Too each his own".
 

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Why would you have to do anything to it ? It's a new gun, it should be fine just the way it is, so shoot it, make some smoke.
I have that exact gun. They fixed the early cylinder throats long ago. That gun should be perfect as is. I have several 45 Colts, but this is the large frame Bisley, built for the hottest loads, that I would not dare shoot in my flat tops or Colt clones. Load it like a 44 mag and enjoy. Totally unnecessary to mess with the trigger if you are going to hunt with it, just shoot it and it will loosen up, mine was perfect out of the box. You do not want a hair trigger on the heavy kickers. I have them down to 8 ounces on target colts, but worthless on a carry or hunting gun.

Mine easily shoots under 2 inches at 25 yards about as good as I can hold it with the magnum level loads. Just shoot it an enjoy. The wood grips really look good on the Bisley stainless.

Enjoy.
 

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Just recently got a used Blackhawk Bisley from the 80's. Had all types of mods dancing in my head. Took it to the range and will not do anything to it. Cast bullets and 2400 printed nice type groups at 15 yards. The previous owner had the front sight thinned, but left a cylinder at the top of the blade and installed a blank blade in the rear sight with a small notch in the center. It was easy to align and the Bisley design handled the recoil. Sort of like an express sight. A gold or brass bead would look outstanding on the front sight. The wood grips that came on it look brand new. Wonder what the previous owner used for grips. Glad he keep the original wood panels.

Just shoot it. Then decide.
 
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