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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would love to get into the reloading game but need help learning where to start. Even though the thought of being able to reload my own ammo excites me, It also has me a little nervous. Are there books to read, courses to take, how did all of you get started? Any help would be much appreciated. I'm looking at reloading for 41 mag and 44 mag for now.
 

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Get a good reloading book, or search for reloading information on the internet. After reading the basics, there are some fairly cheap ways to get started. Its usually best to get a press to start with, even though I handloaded for years. I have a Lee Classic Turret press and love it. You can change the Turrets to change calibers without having to change the settings on the dies. There are plenty of reloaders here to help you when you get started. Anything you don't understand, just ask questions. Our members are very helpful and courteous.
 

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Tribal,
I'm getting back into reloading myself and this time for rifles too. I did 9mm and 45 acp before but now want to do .223 and .308. I had a Dillon square deal progressive but sold it a while ago. Right now I have two single stage presses.

For first time reloader's get at least two or more reloading manuals like Sierra, Speer, Hornaday books (can't ever have enough reloading manuals) and there is a book called something like "The ABC's of reloading" that has a lot of good info. Start on a single stage press until you understand the complete reloading process and then move up to a progressive press if you want.

It's not that hard or dangerous if you pay attention to what you are doing.

Robert
 

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If you’re anything like me, all the reading in the world didn’t make much sense until I got a Lee Anniversary kit and went to work. You do need to have a general idea of what’s going on, true, but things don’t really click until you set up a bench and sit down and go to work.
 

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I would start off with a RCBS Ammo Crafter and add a few key tools like a good set of calipers, digital scale, Stuck case remover, and a Manual from what ever Bullet Mfg'r you plan on shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Guys, Great info! I'm looking forward to getting this started. And bunzo351, I am allot like you! When I went to school for mechanical drafting (in the 80') we had classroom lectures on the use of computers and AutoCad, I nearly flunked out. I got a job in drafting, they put me on a computer with little supervision and within a month, I had AutoCad mastered. I now work in the IT tech field. I hope reloading and "me" has the same outcome.
 

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Tribal, welcome to the forum. Reloading can be a lot of fun, relaxing as well as lucrative. Although I started out as most to save a little money it quickly became a sport unto itself. I was casting bullets, developing loads and basicly having a great time. Got to shoot so I could reload more, so it goes with many.
To start you must book learn. It is a safe hobby if you learn the basics and practice safety, both in your reloading procedures and in your general reloading environment. Eliminating distractions when it is time to prime and powder the cases, no open flames, cigarettes - that type of thing. I recommend the Lyman reloading manual. It has the first sections explaining everything you need to know about reloading, the powders, shells, and has good basic info about the charge weights and bullets. Although it leans toward lead bullets there are plenty of jacketed info included.
Don't just rush in to buying equipment until you have decided what you want to reload for, and how best to achieve your reloading goal. You can get plenty of practice with even the basic sets. Start out with a solid press, dies, accurate scale and powder measure. Obtain the cases and componets, powders bullets, primers best suited to your goals. All can be done a little at a time. Too bad you don't have someone close by that can give you some hands on experience. That is always the best learning tool.
 

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www.leeprecision.com
There are alot of good press choices out there, but in my opinion, the lee stuff is good and priced right for getting started. I really like the turrent press. You can always up-grade slowly later on down the line should you feel a need. A good manual is a must. Lee also has some help video free-bees on their site. Do you have a dedicated location for a reloading set-up? A good solid bench is a must if you go with a bench press. No bench?---I do some loading with a lee hand press and find it enjoyable. Once upon a time i "c" clamped my rock chucker to the dinner table to work---got away with it 25 yrs ago but the honeymoon is over!
 

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I took a Rollaway lower half tool box and put an old shelf board on top with a little over hang on each end and bolted a single stage press on each end with a 4 1/2" vise bolted in the middle towards the back. I can clamp tools to the over hang and I just finished using the Dillon 600 swage to do the primer pockets on some 600 plus LC .223/5.56 brass. The vise works great to hold my brass trimmer and other stuff. When I'm done I can just roll it into the closet or any area I want to work in. I just used the RCBS automatic priming system to prime about 100 LC 5.56/.223 brass and can say that I'll never use a hand primer again.

I just clamped it to my rollaway setup and it works like a charm, I never did enjoy hand priming and should have bought this years ago. I am in the process of doing my first reloads for .223 using Sierra 55gr. Blitzking with 24.4grs H335 powder and Remington 7-1/2 primers in LC brass on my dinning room table with my rollaway next to it.

I also learn better by doing than reading about it.

Robert
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the info guys, very helpful. Will be asking questions after I purchase a few things, good to know you guys are here!
 

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I was like Bunzo351, I let my new RockChucker sit in the box for weeks before I put my hands on it, dreading the setup....only took about 2 hours to mount it, set it up, and adjust everything...then the fun began...looks so much harder than it is...one rule I always followed......check your work at every step....never had a problem.
 

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No matter what reloading equipment you are useing, do like that wise ol' sheepdog says. "Check your work at every step!"
 
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