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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know why S&W decided to reverse the cylinder rotation of their bodyguard snubnose revolver. I don't mind the repositioning of the cylinder release but....

Also, how does it handle?
 

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Evidently the entire rotation mechanism is very different, sort of a "gear drive". Quote from an article in American Rifleman:

The first thing any Smith aficionado will notice is that the cylinder turns backward. By that I mean that it turns clockwise. Opening the cylinder and inspecting the recoil shield, I noticed a couple of things:

There is no window where the hand would come out to rotate the cylinder, and the ratchet looks different. Instead of the normal oblong ratcheting lugs found on the ejector star, the Bodyguard 38 has something of a star-like recess that engages a male counterpart through a hole on the recoil shield. I see a couple of advantages here. With no opening in the recoil shield there is almost no probability that dirt, grit or pocket lint can get into the lockwork and muck it up.

Secondly, assuming that at least part of each star is engaging the recess on the cylinder; that means there is a larger area of contact to distribute rotating force, as well as withstanding firing forces. The advantage there is durability and reliability,
 

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It is a very small revolver so the reason given above for "The advantage there is durability and reliability" makes sense to me.

GB45
 

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I think that durability is going to depend on how strong the ratcheting star whatever it's called is under recoil. I notice Ruger did a quick followup with a steel version in .357 of the LCR while S&W has left the BG38 as a .38 special only version. J frame .357 magnums fly off the shelf for S&W sales so it makes me curious if the design maybe isn't all it's made out to be in durability.
 

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I heard that you need to rotate the cylinder into "lockup" after loading the S&W Bodyguard revolver, due to that ratchet system, or it may not rotate the cylinder properly.

I think the real reason for the new action for the Bodyguard, was probably cost savings. Those parts probably require 0 hand fitting.

I myself would not own a S&W Bodyguard revolver, I hear a LOT more good things about the LCR. I really don't hear anyone raving about the plastic Bodyguard snubs.

If I wanted a light S&W snub I would just get an Airweight, but again, I am looking at a .38 or .357 LCR as a light, all purpose carry gun.
 

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I decided a S&W 442 snub in 38 special was the better choice for me.
 

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My father inlaw just purchased the s&w bodygaurd and i couldnt wait to shoot it, when I did i was glad i decided to purchase the Ruger LCR. The trigger bit into my finger and the grip was way to small for me on the bodygaurd, it also held alot different, your hand holds low on this gun, i didnt care for it.
Just my opinion though..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks. Fit and feel are a very important part in choosing.

I may have a chance to pick one up from a neighbor who is holding his nephew's weapon until he returns from overseas shortly. He has shot it and thinks it is too light, even for a .38 special. His nephew is geting ready to return home soon from overseas and thinking about getting a permit in New York City.
 
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