Ruger Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,439 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I work at a financial institution to remain unnamed, and there were new forms and brochures recently released. Some of them were to be used starting this past Monday. One of these is the New Account Kit with a brochure explaining why IDs are required to open the account, as part of the Homeland Security Act requirements. In the supply lists, and printed on the form, these are listed with their acronym. So now if we ask for the New Account Kit ID form it is a "nakid".
Well, I thought it was funny!
 

·
Code Slinger
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
Yea, some people don't think about the acronym's until its too late. In the computer world we have a command to do a File System ChecK it's fsck.

If you set some word processors like MS Word/Outlook to do an auto-spelling check before sending or saving a document, it replaces the 's' with a 'u'.

So telling the client who might have a bad drive to fsck it comes out with a whole new meaning... :)
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
3,639 Posts
Several years ago, before the mites killed my honeybees, I had 150 hives of bees. I bought some from beekeepers that wanted to sell them. I bought some that I had to go through the college town of Wilburton, Ok to get. My father-in-law, I, and my wife went after dark one night to pick them so where we could stop up the hives and get all the bees. When we came back through Wilburton, we had our bee suits on and the police was having trouble with some college kids, and they had one down on the sidewalk, handcuffed, and when they saw us going by, one of the police stopped us and shined his flash light in the front of the truck at us, and then in the back of the truck, and started hollering, "get out of here", "get out of here".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
I'm going to tattle on myself.
Almost 20 years ago when I started in the lumber business, I worked in the yard and drove a delivery truck. At that time we did a pretty brisk business of selling and delivering prebuilt mini barns in 8x8 , 8x10 and 8x12. Our smaller trucks have 16' dump beds on them and we would put a couple of 4x6-22's on the bed, strap them down tight and set the barns on top of those and when we raised the bed, the barn would slide down the 4x6's onto the ground and we could pull out from under it. One beautiful Friday afternoon the yard boss came out and told me to load an 8x8 barn on the truck and make sure the truck was full of gas because my delivery was about an hour away. The customer wasn't going to be home, but he left a flag in the back yard where he wanted it dumped. When I finally got there, I saw it's going to be a tough one. The backyard sloped down hill to a fairly level area and then sloped pretty steep down to a lake( this fact will be important later). So I backed down the hill to where I needed to have the back of the barn to land and thought to myself " I won't even have to raise the bed since the truck is on an incline, just loosen the straps and it'll slide down nice". So I take the straps off and it won't budge. I jump up on the truck and push, it won't budge. Back in the cab, I pull the lever to raise the bed and when it raised up about 2 inches (I'm looking in the side mirror now )it takes off like a rocket sled on greased runners. My perception of time changes to slow motion as I come to realise that an 8x8 shed is as tall as it is wide and long and is probably top heavy. It hits the ground at an angle and tips over on its back on the steep incline towards the lake, which ,with gravity in full effect, rolls over onto its roof, on to it's front and finally in a big tsunami wave of water, back upright. Time speeds up and I look around to see if anyone is watching. Neighbor kids are slack jawed and wide eyed. I jumped out of the truck, throw my arms in the air and loudly say "Ta - Da ", drug a chain out of the truck, waded knee deep into the lake, hooked it to the runner on the barn and drug it with the truck back up to where the customer wanted it. I left a note for the customer, telling them what had happend and that I would be back the next day to re shigle the barn and replace the trim that got damaged and whatever else the customer wanted. When I got back to the store, I told the manager what happend and what I was going to do to make it right for the customer. He agreed that I did the right thing and that the barn was going to be free, wrote out a check for the amount the customer paid and told me to make sure they took it. Those people have since bought quite a bit of material from us.
Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,439 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Good story Brian, gravity is an amazing thing. I won't tell the story of teaching a co-worker how to load an IH tractor on the trailer and how it ended up half in the back of the truck.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top