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Many years ago, I read an article in a gun magazine. The author explained that one reason he carried a Glock 9mm for SD was that he'd found that semi-automatic pistols tend to be the most reliable when utilizing the cartridge they were originally designed for. Now, I don't have an opinion on this one way or another, mainly because I'm not so sure if it's correct. On the other hand, I'm not so sure it's wrong! But what do you guys think? Would you say that his statement is true? Why or why not?
 

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CARSON-WEST - 2016
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Based on my experience with Kahr, this is true. Based on what I've read of 9mm 1911's, this is also true, although my 9mm 1911 has been just fine.
 

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I don't guess I get the point of it being a Glock. I would basically agree that a semi-automatic pistol design is probably most reliable when used as originally designed. But once you change a design... well you've re-designed it. Done correclty, there is no reason that can't be reliable.

In my mind, modifying and re-designing are 2 different things. With modifying you are always starting with one thing that is finished and changing it to another purpose, say changing a 9mm to a 22LR. A re-design creates an entirely new product that is then not modified to the final desired purpose. Done well and tested, it can be very reliable. Done poorly... you just have a poorly designed item.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't guess I get the point of it being a Glock. I would basically agree that a semi-automatic pistol design is probably most reliable when used as originally designed.

I'm pretty sure he was referring to all semi-autos; a Glock 9 just happened to be what he was using to illustrate his point, presumably since that's what he was carrying for SD.
 

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he was probably using a glock 19 instead of a 17 however ;)


i also disagree with it. reason listed here:


i have a glock 23 (not the "original" design). it has never skipped a beat. here is the kicker, it still hasnt skipped a beat and i've put 100's of rounds through a 9mm conversion barrel (not the original gun design and then the barrel design is differnt).


so, its functioned 100% of the time with 40 cal or 9mm. so how would one be more effective than the other?
 

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Many years ago, I read an article in a gun magazine. The author explained that one reason he carried a Glock 9mm for SD was that he'd found that semi-automatic pistols tend to be the most reliable when utilizing the cartridge they were originally designed for. Now, I don't have an opinion on this one way or another, mainly because I'm not so sure if it's correct. On the other hand, I'm not so sure it's wrong! But what do you guys think? Would you say that his statement is true? Why or why not?
It appears he was saying that as the original Glock was 9mm, that caliber is the most dependable version of the gun. I'm not sure I agree.

As others said, if the gun was modified to make it chamber and fire another caliber it might be compromised in some way.

If a gun was designed along the same lines as the original but all parts specifically sized and built to handle another caliber, then it should be rock solid dependable.
 

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Sounds logical to me. Sometimes additional calibers are after thoughts, frames and materials weren't really meant for the additional ballistics.
 

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It sounds very logical to me. Just because your Glock does OK doesn't mean other brands will do as well. I have a Ruger Blackhawk 357 convertible. With 357 cartridges I practice at 25 to 40 yards. Shooting 9mm it doesn't do as well as my P95. I can reliably hit a 6" target at 25 yards with my P95. With the Blackhawk I have to scoot up a few steps to hit a 6" target every time.

Then again the Blackhack might just be ammo finicky. And I am used to shooting it at long ranges for handgun practice. When I go to a range there is no need to get the Blackhawk out for practice. Most pistol ranges in this area are 50' max.
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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Glock failure

After a thousand or more rounds through my Glock 19 over the last three years I finally had a FTF at the range this morning. Could have been faulty ammo. But that is the first mishap with it.
 

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I have a Ruger Blackhawk 357 convertible. With 357 cartridges I practice at 25 to 40 yards. Shooting 9mm it doesn't do as well as my P95. I can reliably hit a 6" target at 25 yards with my P95. With the Blackhawk I have to scoot up a few steps to hit a 6" target every time.

Then again the Blackhack might just be ammo finicky. And I am used to shooting it at long ranges for handgun practice. When I go to a range there is no need to get the Blackhawk out for practice. Most pistol ranges in this area are 50' max.
Isn't that an issue inherent in trying to make a barrel that works for bullets that are of marginally different diameter: .357" vs .355"? Would the lesser 9mm accuracy be due to a bore that's just a tad too loose?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What ever happened to Glocks #1-16? Does this mean Gaston's first 16 designs were designed for failure.:)
There's one in every crowd......;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
For full size I prefer the glock for deep concealment i prefer the kahr.
Okay, fine...but do you have any thoughts on the original question?
 

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What ever happened to Glocks #1-16? Does this mean Gaston's first 16 designs were designed for failure.:)
Gaston Glock was not originally a gun guy...but rather a manufacturer of plastics, who decided to get into the 'plastic gun' business! Excerpt taken from Wikipidia...

Gaston Glock (born July 19, 1929) is an Austrian engineer, and founder of the firearms company Glock. The well-regarded Glock "safe-action" pistol is used by security forces and law enforcement agencies in 48 countries. The process of producing the Glock pistol includes the application of Tenifer, a patented metal treatment that hardens the slide and barrel. Glock had never actually designed or manufactured a gun until he was 52 years old, but he was already an expert in plastics, having made a small fortune manufacturing curtain rods and grenade shells for the Austrian Army.

His first gun, the Glock 17, was named after the 17th Patent that he owned, and ensuing pistol numbers coincided with their respective patent numbers after that! Hence, the numbering system for the Glock pistols!
 

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Gaston Glock was not originally a gun guy...but rather a manufacturer of plastics, who decided to get into the 'plastic gun' business! Excerpt taken from Wikipidia...
Sounds very similar to Bill Ruger...
 

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Many years ago, I read an article in a gun magazine. The author explained that one reason he carried a Glock 9mm for SD was that he'd found that semi-automatic pistols tend to be the most reliable when utilizing the cartridge they were originally designed for. Now, I don't have an opinion on this one way or another, mainly because I'm not so sure if it's correct. On the other hand, I'm not so sure it's wrong! But what do you guys think? Would you say that his statement is true? Why or why not?
I have always heard the 9mm was originally designed in the 124g FMJ, like the current NATO rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
His first gun, the Glock 17, was named after the 17th Patent that he owned, and ensuing pistol numbers coincided with their respective patent numbers after that! Hence, the numbering system for the Glock pistols![/QUOTE]

Hm! Interesting piece of trivia, that.
 
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