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This is part of my test for all revolvers. I apply a slight drag on the cylinder while slowly cocking the hammer. Sadly, some stores now put trigger locks on all guns (including used) and won't allow this test. How can I confidently buy a classic revolver not knowing it's condition? Silly...
 

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Discussion Starter #43 (Edited)
As promised, I took the Wrangler to the indoor range for a test run. I also took my 4 5/8" Liberty Single-Six for a comparison. I'm happy to say ..... no more keyholes in the target, no matter how slow I cocked the Wrangler's hammer. I was shooting from a standing position at 15 yards, using both hands, and I shot decent groups .... mostly about 1 1/2", which isn't bad for this shaky old phart. I tried a test .... first shooting 6 rounds from the Wrangler, then shooting 6 rounds from the Single-Six until I had fired 24 rounds in each gun. There was virtually no difference in group size and both guns functioned flawless. About the only thing I noticed that favored the Single-Six was the slightly better sight picture with the adjustable sights. That said, it must not have made any difference in my marksmanship skills because the groups were nearly identical. The 2 ounce difference in weight was not noticeable, however the Wrangler had a more natural balance because of the much heavier zinc grip frame versus the aluminum alloy grip frame on the single-Six

This is just for wproct: Granted, the Wrangler is made with cheaper materials but that doesn't mean it sacrifices accuracy or function at 1/3 the price of a Single-Six. I doubt if I or (any other shooter) will live long enough to wear one out. Back in the late 70's I had a Colt Frontier Scout that had an aluminum alloy cylinder frame and grip frame. I put dozens of bricks of 22 LR through that gun. I finally cleaned it up and sold it for more than I paid for it. Point being .... the aluminum held up just fine for more rounds than an average person shoots in a lifetime.

Here's my Wrangler's companion .... a "Liberty" Single-Six in like new condition:


 

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Iowegan, regardless of my previous post, I really do understand your love for the Wrangler. A similar comparison. I have owned several 77/22 rifles in my lifetime, but now I do not own one, but I do own a Ruger American Rimfire rifle in .22 magnum, and I would not trade it even up for the same caliber in a 77/22. I actually think the RAR is a better rifle.:)
 

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Iowegan,
Same problem with my Wrangler serial #200-126xx. Could never get reliable group and some splatter that I attributed to the .014 cylinder gap before I checked the lockup on mine. Also a lot of leading. I can cock all six chambers without locking the cylinder.
Guess I'll call Ruger and see what they say about the lockup and if the .014 gap is within specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
reh, Sounds like you got a bad specimen. The typical gun smith spec for B/C gap is .004~.008". Ruger's spec may be more but I doubt if it would be over .010". Your gun is sick and needs to go to Ruger's Critical Care Unit for a new pawl and barrel depth adjustment.
 

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After reading this I checked my single 10. When I slow cock the hammer I hear the cylinder latch on 7 of the 10 cylinders about midway between the other two clicks. On the other three cylinders the last two clicks are almost at the same point, depending on how slow I cock the hammer. Unfortunately at least 2 cylinders can have the hammer locked before the cylinder is latched.

How they latch seems to vary, I'm assuming it's based on how fast I cock the hammer. The three cylinders that latch differently are together on the cylinder.

I'm a bit perplexed, if this were a pawl issue like on the Wrangler, wouldn't all the cylinders be the same?
 

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Discussion Starter #49
dlbind, A slightly longer lower tooth on the pawl would fix your problem. I think you meant "chambers", not "cylinders" .... There can be a slight variation in the ratchet notches so it is not unusual to have the cylinder time a bit different for each chamber. As long as the cylinder latches up properly for each chamber with your normal cocking speed, it shouldn't be a problem. If there is a condition where the cylinder is not latched with normal cocking, then I would send it back to the mother ship for repair. The primary indication of bad timing is when you see oval or keyhole bullet holes in your target and scattered groups. So, how does your Single-!0 shoot?
 
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Iowegan, Thanks for the info.....and yes chambers not cylinder. There is one chamber that might not latch at a cocking speed I might use. I don't have to move the cylinder much to make it latch.

As far as shooting, I rarely put it on paper to know if there are keyholes. I'll have to make it a point to do that.

I took my single 10 apart to look at it. Obviously I'm not an expert but I looked for unusual wear marks. The most wear I found was on the cylinder latch. I tried the latch in each notch, it fit tight in all of them. I cleaned it up and put it back together.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
When I was trouble shooting my Wrangler, I used my endoscope and took some pictures inside the bore (from the muzzle to the firing pin). The first picture is a "before" where the cylinder failed to lock up. You can see the misalignment between the cylinder throat and the bore. The second picture is an "after" when the cylinder is latched. You can imagine how the bullet would not like going through a misaligned revolver.


 

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It sure does. A picture is worth a thousand times more than words....in a lot of explanations. Glad we got Iowegan here on this forum.
 
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