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Discussion Starter #1
I recently had an action job done on a .38+P 3" SP-101 revolver.

I had an 8-pound Wolff trigger spring, and a 9-pound Wolff hammer spring installed. I asked the gunsmith to further lighten the hammer spring for smoother cocking. DA pull is 8 pounds; SA pull is 4 pounds.

Here's the problem. When I attempt to DA fire all five rounds quickly, the trigger frequently jams (freezes) because the trigger return spring is so weak that it can't "spring" back to the starting position under its own power.

How can I clean up this mess? This is a CCW revolver.
 

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Well,since you asked.Go back to the spring combination that proves itself to be 100% reliable in functioning in both DA and SA modes.Who cares about smoother cocking if the gun "freezes up" when called upon in a deadly force situation.You've put yourself and others at risk by going down that slippery slope of ever lighter trigger pull weight versus reliable functioning.It's not a target pistol,it's your CCW.Employ the KISS philosophy.Oh yeah,I almost forgot.Find yourself another "gunsmith".Someone who will say "No,not when your life depends on it."
 

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jsmosby, You have exceeded the point of diminishing returns .... that's where further modifications begin to affect other functions of the gun. I believe it's called friction. Ruger put a trigger return spring in the gun to .... yup, return the trigger. In order for that to happen, the spring must be strong enough to overcome the friction of the trigger plunger.

Additionally, you will probably find the hammer spring is too weak to detonate some brands of primers (ie CCI) and most magnum primers. Again, when you push the envelope past design limits, things don't work.

The solution is very simple. Install a 12 lb hammer spring and a 10 lb trigger spring and everything will work .... otherwise, you just have an expensive paper weight.

After you get 100 posts, the Library Forum will become visible. You can then download my IBOK for the GP-100 free. The design is nearly identical for the SP-101 so all you have to do is follow the step-by-step instructions to smooth out your revolver.
 

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Here's the problem. When I attempt to DA fire all five rounds quickly, the trigger frequently jams (freezes) because the trigger return spring is so weak that it can't "spring" back to the starting position under its own power.
When I did a "clean-up/slick-up" on the internals of my newly purchased GP100, I spent a _LOT_ of time working on the area of the trigger return spring, the bore that it traveled in, the trigger link plunger, and the trigger link. I now have a 10 lb trigger return spring installed. OEM spring is 12 lb, I think. With this 10 lb spring, neither myself nor others who shoot my GP100.......are able to "outrun" the trigger. Even when "dry firing". It now _always_ returns nicely, smoothly, and quickly.

The first time I dismantled that area of the GP, I could see that some sleepy Ruger factory worker had gotten part of his shirt-tail wound up in the trigger return spring! Really!! There was a shredded hunk of fabric wound about the spring. I was surprised that up until then, the trigger HAD returned at all.

My first order of biz was working on the bore that the spring and plunger travelled in. It was 40 miles of ruff road in there. I knocked off the tits and highest chunks with a drill bit, manually. Then went to work with dowels and matchsticks and emery paper. This was VERY time consuming, cuz it was so ruff in there, and I was also concerned about making that bore oversize. After the emery paper, I made a series of snug fitting "laps", and lapped the bore with ever-decreasing grit sizes. Finished with a tiny home-made swab doused with BRASSO. Man, it was beautiful in there now!!

Next I worked on the plunger itself. The OD of the plunger was smooth, and it was round, but both ends, especially the front end, was burred. I made a fixture to hold the plunger, got out the eye loupe, and went to work smoothing and chamfering the ends. Did a final polish with a hard Arkansas stone. Now that plunger slid back and forth in the bore just as smooth and slick as can be!

Next I polished the OD of the spring in my lathe, and also dressed the "snaggy" ends of the spring. That part went quick.

The trigger link was stoned and buffed, and where it engaged the end of the plunger, I lapped the link and plunger together.

This is what worked for me.....and continues to work for me, as I slowly and cautiously tweak other areas of my GP100.

FJ Lee Denver CO
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice, Iowegan. I plan to do just what you recommended. My background is SAs and 1911s. I learned the hard way that you can't tune the trigger action of a DA revolver into a lighter SA-type pull.
 
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